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Title: The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VIII. The Influence of the Cluster Properties on H α Emitter Galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7

Abstract

In exploiting the data of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), we characterize the spatial distribution of star formation in 76 highly active star-forming galaxies in 10 clusters at $$0.3\lt z\lt 0.7$$. All of these galaxies are likely restricted to first infall. We contrast the properties of field and cluster galaxies, in a companion paper, whereas here we correlate the properties of Hα emitters to a number of tracers of the cluster environment to investigate its role in driving galaxy transformations. Hα emitters are found in the clusters out to 0.5 virial radii, the maximum radius covered by GLASS. The peak of the Hα emission is offset with respect to the peak of the UV continuum. We also decompose these offsets into a radial and a tangential component. The radial component points away from the cluster center in 60% of the cases, with 95% confidence. The decompositions agree with cosmological simulations; that is, the Hα emission offset correlates with galaxy velocity and ram-pressure stripping signatures. Furthermore, trends between Hα emitter properties and surface mass density distributions and X-ray emissions emerge only for unrelaxed clusters. The lack of strong correlations with the global environment does not allow us to identify a unique environmental effect originating from the cluster center. In contrast, correlations between Hα morphology and local number density emerge. We conclude that local effects, uncorrelated to the cluster-centric radius, play a more important role in shaping galaxy properties.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [5];  [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [8];  [8]; ORCiD logo [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [7];  [9];  [10];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Melbourne (Australia). School of Physics
  2. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  3. Bologna Univ. (Italy). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  4. Leibniz Inst. for Astrophysics, Potsdam (Germany)
  5. Observatories of the Carnegie Inst. for Science, Pasadena, CA (United States)
  6. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy; Tohoku Univ., Sendai (Japan). Astronomical Inst. and Inst. for International Advanced Research and Education
  7. National Inst. of Astrophysics (INAF), Rome (Italy). Astronomical Observatory of Rome
  8. Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Physics
  9. Stony Brook Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  10. Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Kavli Inst. for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology; SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1352632
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
The Astrophysical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: The Astrophysical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 837; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-4357
Publisher:
Institute of Physics (IOP)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; galaxies: clusters: general; galaxies: evolution; galaxies: formation; galaxies: general; galaxies: star formation

Citation Formats

Vulcani, Benedetta, Treu, Tommaso, Nipoti, Carlo, Schmidt, Kasper B., Dressler, Alan, Morshita, Takahiro, Poggianti, Bianca M., Malkan, Matthew, Hoag, Austin, Bradač, Marusa, Abramson, Louis, Trenti, Michele, Pentericci, Laura, Linden, Anja von der, Morris, Glenn, and Wang, Xin. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VIII. The Influence of the Cluster Properties on H α Emitter Galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa618b.
Vulcani, Benedetta, Treu, Tommaso, Nipoti, Carlo, Schmidt, Kasper B., Dressler, Alan, Morshita, Takahiro, Poggianti, Bianca M., Malkan, Matthew, Hoag, Austin, Bradač, Marusa, Abramson, Louis, Trenti, Michele, Pentericci, Laura, Linden, Anja von der, Morris, Glenn, & Wang, Xin. The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VIII. The Influence of the Cluster Properties on H α Emitter Galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7. United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa618b.
Vulcani, Benedetta, Treu, Tommaso, Nipoti, Carlo, Schmidt, Kasper B., Dressler, Alan, Morshita, Takahiro, Poggianti, Bianca M., Malkan, Matthew, Hoag, Austin, Bradač, Marusa, Abramson, Louis, Trenti, Michele, Pentericci, Laura, Linden, Anja von der, Morris, Glenn, and Wang, Xin. Fri . "The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VIII. The Influence of the Cluster Properties on H α Emitter Galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7". United States. doi:10.3847/1538-4357/aa618b. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352632.
@article{osti_1352632,
title = {The Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). VIII. The Influence of the Cluster Properties on H α Emitter Galaxies at 0.3 < z < 0.7},
author = {Vulcani, Benedetta and Treu, Tommaso and Nipoti, Carlo and Schmidt, Kasper B. and Dressler, Alan and Morshita, Takahiro and Poggianti, Bianca M. and Malkan, Matthew and Hoag, Austin and Bradač, Marusa and Abramson, Louis and Trenti, Michele and Pentericci, Laura and Linden, Anja von der and Morris, Glenn and Wang, Xin},
abstractNote = {In exploiting the data of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS), we characterize the spatial distribution of star formation in 76 highly active star-forming galaxies in 10 clusters at $0.3\lt z\lt 0.7$. All of these galaxies are likely restricted to first infall. We contrast the properties of field and cluster galaxies, in a companion paper, whereas here we correlate the properties of Hα emitters to a number of tracers of the cluster environment to investigate its role in driving galaxy transformations. Hα emitters are found in the clusters out to 0.5 virial radii, the maximum radius covered by GLASS. The peak of the Hα emission is offset with respect to the peak of the UV continuum. We also decompose these offsets into a radial and a tangential component. The radial component points away from the cluster center in 60% of the cases, with 95% confidence. The decompositions agree with cosmological simulations; that is, the Hα emission offset correlates with galaxy velocity and ram-pressure stripping signatures. Furthermore, trends between Hα emitter properties and surface mass density distributions and X-ray emissions emerge only for unrelaxed clusters. The lack of strong correlations with the global environment does not allow us to identify a unique environmental effect originating from the cluster center. In contrast, correlations between Hα morphology and local number density emerge. We conclude that local effects, uncorrelated to the cluster-centric radius, play a more important role in shaping galaxy properties.},
doi = {10.3847/1538-4357/aa618b},
journal = {The Astrophysical Journal (Online)},
number = 2,
volume = 837,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Mar 10 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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  • We present the first study of the spatial distribution of star formation in z ∼ 0.5 cluster galaxies. The analysis is based on data taken with the Wide Field Camera 3 as part of the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS). We illustrate the methodology by focusing on two clusters (MACS 0717.5+3745 and MACS 1423.8+2404) with different morphologies (one relaxed and one merging) and use foreground and background galaxies as a field control sample. The cluster+field sample consists of 42 galaxies with stellar masses in the range 10{sup 8}–10{sup 11} M{sub ⊙} and star formation rates in the range 1–20 M{sub ⊙} yr{supmore » −1}. Both in clusters and in the field, Hα is more extended than the rest-frame UV continuum in 60% of the cases, consistent with diffuse star formation and inside-out growth. In ∼20% of the cases, the Hα emission appears more extended in cluster galaxies than in the field, pointing perhaps to ionized gas being stripped and/or star formation being enhanced at large radii. The peak of the Hα emission and that of the continuum are offset by less than 1 kpc. We investigate trends with the hot gas density as traced by the X-ray emission, and with the surface mass density as inferred from gravitational lens models, and find no conclusive results. The diversity of morphologies and sizes observed in Hα illustrates the complexity of the environmental processes that regulate star formation. Upcoming analysis of the full GLASS data set will increase our sample size by almost an order of magnitude, verifying and strengthening the inference from this initial data set.« less
  • We present a strong and weak lensing reconstruction of the massive cluster Abell 2744, the first cluster for which deep Hubble Frontier Fields (HFF) images and spectroscopy from the Grism Lens-Amplified Survey from Space (GLASS) are available. By performing a targeted search for emission lines in multiply imaged sources using the GLASS spectra, we obtain five high-confidence spectroscopic redshifts and two tentative ones. We confirm one strongly lensed system by detecting the same emission lines in all three multiple images. We also search for additional line emitters blindly and use the full GLASS spectroscopic catalog to test reliability of photometricmore » redshifts for faint line emitters. We see a reasonable agreement between our photometric and spectroscopic redshift measurements, when including nebular emission in photometric redshift estimations. We introduce a stringent procedure to identify only secure multiple image sets based on colors, morphology, and spectroscopy. By combining 7 multiple image systems with secure spectroscopic redshifts (at 5 distinct redshift planes) with 18 multiple image systems with secure photometric redshifts, we reconstruct the gravitational potential of the cluster pixellated on an adaptive grid, using a total of 72 images. The resulting mass map is compared with a stellar mass map obtained from the deep Spitzer Frontier Fields data to study the relative distribution of stars and dark matter in the cluster. We find that the stellar to total mass ratio varies substantially across the cluster field, suggesting that stars do not trace exactly the total mass in this interacting system. The maps of convergence, shear, and magnification are made available in the standard HFF format.« less
  • We present results of a search for emission-line galaxies (ELGs) in the southern fields of the Hubble Space Telescope Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) grism survey. The PEARS South Fields consist of five Advanced Camera for Surveys pointings (including the Hubble Ultra Deep Field) with the G800L grism for a total of 120 orbits, revealing thousands of faint object spectra in the GOODS-South region of the sky. ELGs are one subset of objects that are prevalent among the grism spectra. Using a two-dimensional detection and extraction procedure, we find 320 emission lines originating from 226 galaxy 'knots' within 192more » individual galaxies. Line identification results in 118 new grism-spectroscopic redshifts for galaxies in the GOODS-South Field. We measure emission-line fluxes using standard Gaussian fitting techniques. At the resolution of the grism data, the H{beta} and [O III] doublet are blended. However, by fitting two Gaussian components to the H{beta} and [O III] features, we find that many of the PEARS ELGs have high [O III]/H{beta} ratios compared to other galaxy samples of comparable luminosities. The star formation rates of the ELGs are presented, as well as a sample of distinct giant star-forming regions at z {approx} 0.1-0.5 across individual galaxies. We find that the radial distances of these H II regions in general reside near the galaxies' optical continuum half-light radii, similar to those of giant H II regions in local galaxies.« less
  • We present a full analysis of the Probing Evolution And Reionization Spectroscopically (PEARS) slitess grism spectroscopic data obtained with the Advanced Camera for Surveys on board Hubble Space Telescope. PEARS covers fields within both the Great Observatories Origins Deep Survey (GOODS) North and South fields, making it ideal as a random survey of galaxies, as well as the availability of a wide variety of ancillary observations complemented by the spectroscopic results. Using the PEARS data, we are able to identify star-forming galaxies (SFGs) within the redshift volume 0 < z < 1.5. Star-forming regions in the PEARS survey are pinpointedmore » independently of the host galaxy. This method allows us to detect the presence of multiple emission-line regions (ELRs) within a single galaxy. We identified a total of 1162 H{alpha}, [O III], and/or [O II] emission lines in the PEARS sample of 906 galaxies to a limiting flux of {approx}10{sup -18} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. The ELRs have also been compared to the properties of the host galaxy, including morphology, luminosity, and mass. From this analysis, we find three key results: (1) the computed line luminosities show evidence of a flattening in the luminosity function with increasing redshift; (2) the star-forming systems show evidence of complex morphologies with star formation occurring predominantly within one effective (half-light) radius. However, the morphologies show no correlation with host stellar mass. (3) Also, the number density of SFGs with M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun} decreases by an order of magnitude at z {<=} 0.5 relative to the number at 0.5 < z < 0.9, supporting the argument of galaxy downsizing.« less