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Title: Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation

Abstract

The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Institute for Molecular Engineering
  2. Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering
  3. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States). Institute for Molecular Engineering; Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Materials Science Division
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)
OSTI Identifier:
1352578
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Central Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 9; Journal ID: ISSN 2374-7943
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Lequieu, Joshua, Córdoba, Andrés, Hinckley, Daniel, and de Pablo, Juan J. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00170.
Lequieu, Joshua, Córdoba, Andrés, Hinckley, Daniel, & de Pablo, Juan J. Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation. United States. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00170.
Lequieu, Joshua, Córdoba, Andrés, Hinckley, Daniel, and de Pablo, Juan J. 2016. "Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation". United States. doi:10.1021/acscentsci.6b00170. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352578.
@article{osti_1352578,
title = {Mechanical Response of DNA–Nanoparticle Crystals to Controlled Deformation},
author = {Lequieu, Joshua and Córdoba, Andrés and Hinckley, Daniel and de Pablo, Juan J.},
abstractNote = {The self-assembly of DNA-conjugated nanoparticles represents a promising avenue toward the design of engineered hierarchical materials. By using DNA to encode nanoscale interactions, macroscale crystals can be formed with mechanical properties that can, at least in principle, be tuned. Here we present in silico evidence that the mechanical response of these assemblies can indeed be controlled, and that subtle modifications of the linking DNA sequences can change the Young’s modulus from 97 kPa to 2.1 MPa. We rely on a detailed molecular model to quantify the energetics of DNA–nanoparticle assembly and demonstrate that the mechanical response is governed by entropic, rather than enthalpic, contributions and that the response of the entire network can be estimated from the elastic properties of an individual nanoparticle. The results here provide a first step toward the mechanical characterization of DNA–nanoparticle assemblies, and suggest the possibility of mechanical metamaterials constructed using DNA.},
doi = {10.1021/acscentsci.6b00170},
journal = {ACS Central Science},
number = 9,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Journal Article:
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