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Title: Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility

Abstract

Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realization of active, self-propelled ‘particles’, a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity, and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modeling on the whole cell level. Furthermore we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organized systems such as living cells.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Albert-Ludwigs-Univ. Freiburg, Freiburg (Germany); Institut Charles Sadron, Strasbourg (France)
  2. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); Materials Sciences and Engineering Division; German Science Foundation
OSTI Identifier:
1352532
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
npj Computational Materials
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2057-3960
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 25 ENERGY STORAGE

Citation Formats

Ziebert, Falko, and Aranson, Igor S. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/npjcompumats.2016.19.
Ziebert, Falko, & Aranson, Igor S. Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility. United States. doi:10.1038/npjcompumats.2016.19.
Ziebert, Falko, and Aranson, Igor S. 2016. "Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility". United States. doi:10.1038/npjcompumats.2016.19. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352532.
@article{osti_1352532,
title = {Computational approaches to substrate-based cell motility},
author = {Ziebert, Falko and Aranson, Igor S.},
abstractNote = {Substrate-based crawling motility of eukaryotic cells is essential for many biological functions, both in developing and mature organisms. Motility dysfunctions are involved in several life-threatening pathologies such as cancer and metastasis. Motile cells are also a natural realization of active, self-propelled ‘particles’, a popular research topic in nonequilibrium physics. Finally, from the materials perspective, assemblies of motile cells and evolving tissues constitute a class of adaptive self-healing materials that respond to the topography, elasticity, and surface chemistry of the environment and react to external stimuli. Although a comprehensive understanding of substrate-based cell motility remains elusive, progress has been achieved recently in its modeling on the whole cell level. Furthermore we survey the most recent advances in computational approaches to cell movement and demonstrate how these models improve our understanding of complex self-organized systems such as living cells.},
doi = {10.1038/npjcompumats.2016.19},
journal = {npj Computational Materials},
number = ,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}

Journal Article:
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