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Title: Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes

Abstract

Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1352450
Report Number(s):
DOE-MSU-14907
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-98ER14907
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Bruening, Merlin. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352450.
Bruening, Merlin. Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes. United States. doi:10.2172/1352450.
Bruening, Merlin. Fri . "Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes". United States. doi:10.2172/1352450. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352450.
@article{osti_1352450,
title = {Electrically Driven Ion Separations in Permeable Membranes},
author = {Bruening, Merlin},
abstractNote = {Membranes are attractive for a wide range of separations due to their low energy costs and continuous operation. To achieve practical fluxes, most membranes consist of a thin, selective skin on a highly permeable substrate that provides mechanical strength. Thus, this project focused on creating new methods for forming highly selective ultrathin skins as well as modeling transport through these coatings to better understand their unprecedented selectivities. The research explored both gas and ion separations, and the latter included transport due to concentration, pressure and electrical potential gradients. This report describes a series of highlights of the research and then provides a complete list of publications supported by the grant. These publications have been cited more than 4000 times. Perhaps the most stunning finding is the recent discovery of monovalent/divalent cation and anion selectivities around 1000 when modifying cation- and anion-exchange membranes with polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs). This discovery builds on many years of exciting research. (Citation numbers refer to the journal articles in the bibliography.)},
doi = {10.2172/1352450},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Apr 21 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • The Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), under sponsorship by the Bureau of Mines, evaluated the use of polyphosphazene-based polymer membranes for chemical separations. Synthetic membranes based on phosphazene inorganic polymers offer the promise of new industrial chemical separation technologies that are more energy efficient and economical than traditional phase change separation processes and extraction techniques. The research focused on the separation of metal ions from aqueous solutions. The polyphosphazene membranes were also tested for gaseous separations, results of which are presented in a separate Report of Investigation. Historically, membranes used for chemical separation have been prepared from organic polymers. Inmore » general, these membranes are stable only at temperatures less than 100{degrees}C, within narrow pH ranges, and in a very limited number of organic media. As a result, many organic- based membranes are unsuitable for industrial applications, which often involve harsh environments. In recent years, membrane research has focused on ceramic and metal membranes for use in the adverse environments of separation applications. These membranes are suitable for gas and liquid sieve separation applications, where molecules may be separated based on their molecular size. These membranes are not effective where additional selectivity is needed. A membrane that separates on the basis of solubility and that can perform separations in adverse environments is needed, and this need motivated the investigation of polyphosphazene membranes.« less
  • The use of the Douvan potential applied to ion exchange membranes as a transfer process to remove and/or concentrate ions from process and waste aqueous streams was investigated.
  • Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950more » C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).« less