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Title: Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems

Abstract

Project DE-FE0024075 deals with the development of a moderate-temperature sorbent-based oxygen production technology. Sorbent-based oxygen production process utilizes oxygen-storage properties of Perovskites to (1) adsorb oxygen from air in a solid sorbent, and (2) release the adsorbed oxygen into a sweep gas such as CO 2 and/or steam for gasification systems or recycled flue gas for oxy-combustion systems. Pure oxygen can be produced by the use of vacuum instead of a sweep gas to affect the pressure swing. By developing more efficient and stable, higher sorption capacity, newer class of materials operating at moderate temperatures this process represents a major advancement in air separation technology. Newly developed perovskite ceramic sorbent materials with order-disorder transition have a higher O 2 adsorption capacity, potentially 200 °C lower operating temperatures, and up to two orders of magnitude faster desorption rates than those used in earlier development efforts. The performance advancements afforded by the new materials lead to substantial savings in capital investment and operational costs. Cost of producing oxygen using sorbents could be as much as 26% lower than VPSA and about 13% lower than a large cryogenic air separation unit. Cost advantage against large cryogenic separation is limited because sorbent-based separation numbersmore » up sorbent modules for achieving the larger capacity.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Western Research Inst. (WRI), Laramie, WY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE)
Contributing Org.:
Arizona State University
OSTI Identifier:
1352448
Report Number(s):
WRI/EP&G-17-001
DOE Contract Number:
FE0024075
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; 01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 09 BIOMASS FUELS; Oxygen Production; Sorbents; Perovskite; Oxy-combustion; Low-cost Oxygen

Citation Formats

Sethi, Vijay. Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352448.
Sethi, Vijay. Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems. United States. doi:10.2172/1352448.
Sethi, Vijay. Tue . "Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems". United States. doi:10.2172/1352448. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352448.
@article{osti_1352448,
title = {Sorbent-based Oxygen Production for Energy Systems},
author = {Sethi, Vijay},
abstractNote = {Project DE-FE0024075 deals with the development of a moderate-temperature sorbent-based oxygen production technology. Sorbent-based oxygen production process utilizes oxygen-storage properties of Perovskites to (1) adsorb oxygen from air in a solid sorbent, and (2) release the adsorbed oxygen into a sweep gas such as CO2 and/or steam for gasification systems or recycled flue gas for oxy-combustion systems. Pure oxygen can be produced by the use of vacuum instead of a sweep gas to affect the pressure swing. By developing more efficient and stable, higher sorption capacity, newer class of materials operating at moderate temperatures this process represents a major advancement in air separation technology. Newly developed perovskite ceramic sorbent materials with order-disorder transition have a higher O2 adsorption capacity, potentially 200 °C lower operating temperatures, and up to two orders of magnitude faster desorption rates than those used in earlier development efforts. The performance advancements afforded by the new materials lead to substantial savings in capital investment and operational costs. Cost of producing oxygen using sorbents could be as much as 26% lower than VPSA and about 13% lower than a large cryogenic air separation unit. Cost advantage against large cryogenic separation is limited because sorbent-based separation numbers up sorbent modules for achieving the larger capacity.},
doi = {10.2172/1352448},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 31 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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