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Title: Kink Band Propagation During Plastic Deformation of Bulk Metallic Nanolaminates

Authors:
 [1]; ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2];  [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Laboratory
  2. University of California Santa Barbara
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOD
OSTI Identifier:
1352447
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-21563
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: TMS 2017 ; 2017-02-26 - 2017-03-02 ; San Diego, California, United States
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Kink Bands

Citation Formats

Nizolek, Thomas Joseph, Mara, Nathan Allan, Mccabe, Rodney James, Beyerlein, Irene Jane, Avallone, Jaclyn T, and Pollock, Tresa M. Kink Band Propagation During Plastic Deformation of Bulk Metallic Nanolaminates. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Nizolek, Thomas Joseph, Mara, Nathan Allan, Mccabe, Rodney James, Beyerlein, Irene Jane, Avallone, Jaclyn T, & Pollock, Tresa M. Kink Band Propagation During Plastic Deformation of Bulk Metallic Nanolaminates. United States.
Nizolek, Thomas Joseph, Mara, Nathan Allan, Mccabe, Rodney James, Beyerlein, Irene Jane, Avallone, Jaclyn T, and Pollock, Tresa M. 2017. "Kink Band Propagation During Plastic Deformation of Bulk Metallic Nanolaminates". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352447.
@article{osti_1352447,
title = {Kink Band Propagation During Plastic Deformation of Bulk Metallic Nanolaminates},
author = {Nizolek, Thomas Joseph and Mara, Nathan Allan and Mccabe, Rodney James and Beyerlein, Irene Jane and Avallone, Jaclyn T and Pollock, Tresa M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Conference:
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  • Strain-induced hardening and annealing-induced softening are typical in crystalline metals. Bulk metallic glasses (BMG) exhibit the opposite behavior, namely, strain-induced softening and annealing-induced hardening. In addition, reversible softening-hardening-softening occurs in a BMG subjected to a three-step deformation-annealing-deformation process. The hardness changes after deformation and annealing can be correlated with the shear band patterns around/underneath Vickers indents. Shear bands produced during indentation of as-cast BMG are semicircular and radial, consistent with the stress distribution beneath the indenter. In contrast, the shear bands in the pre-strained BMG are irregular and convoluted, and appear to be a mixture of the shear bands producedmore » during the prior compression and those in the as-cast BMG. After annealing, the shear bands tend to recover their semicircular and radial shapes consistent with the annealing-induced hardening.« less
  • During high velocity impact experiments, projectile impact creates extreme pressure waves that results in a significant localized deformation within a short period of time. Experiments under these conditions require sophisticated data acquisition technique to better understand the materials deformation mechanisms. Since these experiments are expensive, it is also beneficial to develop accurate computational models that can predict this kind of deformation in high velocity impact events.
  • Starting with Zr of two different purities, Zr-based bulk metallic glasses (BMGs) with a nominal composition of Zr{sub 62}Cu{sub 15.5}Ni{sub 12.5}Al{sub 10} were prepared having oxygen concentrations of about 3900 and 920 at. ppm, respectively. Uniaxial compression tests showed that the BMG containing the higher level of oxygen has a higher yield strength and is capable of undergoing much less plastic deformation than that containing the lower level of oxygen. It appears that oxygen suppresses the formation of multiple shear bands but leads to an inability to sustain shear-band propagation, thus, changing the failure mode from relatively ductile to catastrophicmore » brittle fracture.« less
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  • Using high-energy X-ray diffraction we examined the atomic structure in bulk metallic glass samples which underwent severe plastic deformation by the high-pressure torsion (HPT) technique. We obtained the atomic pair distribution function (PDF) and determined the changes in the PDFs due to deformation. The observed changes in the PDF clearly show structural disordering, which suggests structural rejuvenation by heavy deformation. However, the changes cannot be explained simply in terms of creating excess free volume, and they indicate that much more extensive atomic rearrangements take place as a consequence of deformation. Also, we suggest that the observed structural change may wellmore » be an outcome of local heating due to deformation and may not directly provide the knowledge of the atomistic mechanism of strain localization.« less