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Title: Open Data and the Free Access to Law Movement in the United States

Abstract

US President Barack Obama issued Executive Order 13642-Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government - on May, 9 2013, mandating, wherever legally permissible and possible, that US Government information be made open to the public.[1] This edict accelerated the construction of and framework for data repositories, and data citation principles and practices, such as data.gov. As a corollary, researchers across the country's national laboratories found themselves creating data management plans, applying data set metadata standards, and ensuring the long-term access of data for federally funded scientific research.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1352385
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-21958
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Program Document
Resource Relation:
Related Information: The Winnower, ISSN 2373-146X
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
96 KNOWLEDGE MANAGEMENT AND PRESERVATION; Information Science; Open Data, Legal Research, Open Access

Citation Formats

Finnell, Joshua Eugene. Open Data and the Free Access to Law Movement in the United States. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Finnell, Joshua Eugene. Open Data and the Free Access to Law Movement in the United States. United States.
Finnell, Joshua Eugene. 2016. "Open Data and the Free Access to Law Movement in the United States". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352385.
@article{osti_1352385,
title = {Open Data and the Free Access to Law Movement in the United States},
author = {Finnell, Joshua Eugene},
abstractNote = {US President Barack Obama issued Executive Order 13642-Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government - on May, 9 2013, mandating, wherever legally permissible and possible, that US Government information be made open to the public.[1] This edict accelerated the construction of and framework for data repositories, and data citation principles and practices, such as data.gov. As a corollary, researchers across the country's national laboratories found themselves creating data management plans, applying data set metadata standards, and ensuring the long-term access of data for federally funded scientific research.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 6
}

Program Document:
Other availability
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