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Title: Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate

Abstract

Here, we examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clusteringmore » motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Babes-Bolyai Univ., Cluj (Romania)
  2. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)
OSTI Identifier:
1352371
Alternate Identifier(s):
OSTI ID: 1339780
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-16-28317
Journal ID: ISSN 2470-0045; PLEEE8; TRN: US1700969
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Physical Review E
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 95; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2470-0045
Publisher:
American Physical Society (APS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Material Science

Citation Formats

Sándor, Csand, Libál, Andras, Reichhardt, Charles, and Reichhardt, Cynthia Jane Olson. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.95.012607.
Sándor, Csand, Libál, Andras, Reichhardt, Charles, & Reichhardt, Cynthia Jane Olson. Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate. United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.95.012607.
Sándor, Csand, Libál, Andras, Reichhardt, Charles, and Reichhardt, Cynthia Jane Olson. Tue . "Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate". United States. doi:10.1103/PhysRevE.95.012607. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352371.
@article{osti_1352371,
title = {Collective transport for active matter run-and-tumble disk systems on a traveling-wave substrate},
author = {Sándor, Csand and Libál, Andras and Reichhardt, Charles and Reichhardt, Cynthia Jane Olson},
abstractNote = {Here, we examine numerically the transport of an assembly of active run-and-tumble disks interacting with a traveling-wave substrate. We show that as a function of substrate strength, wave speed, disk activity, and disk density, a variety of dynamical phases arise that are correlated with the structure and net flux of disks. We find that there is a sharp transition into a state in which the disks are only partially coupled to the substrate and form a phase-separated cluster state. This transition is associated with a drop in the net disk flux, and it can occur as a function of the substrate speed, maximum substrate force, disk run time, and disk density. Since variation of the disk activity parameters produces different disk drift rates for a fixed traveling-wave speed on the substrate, the system we consider could be used as an efficient method for active matter species separation. Within the cluster phase, we find that in some regimes the motion of the cluster center of mass is in the opposite direction to that of the traveling wave, while when the maximum substrate force is increased, the cluster drifts in the direction of the traveling wave. This suggests that swarming or clustering motion can serve as a method by which an active system can collectively move against an external drift.},
doi = {10.1103/PhysRevE.95.012607},
journal = {Physical Review E},
number = 1,
volume = 95,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Jan 17 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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