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Title: Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure

Abstract

Research during the granting period has been carried out in several areas concerned with sensitive detection. An infrared pyrometer based on the photoacoustic effect has been developed. The sensitivity of this instrument to temperature differentials has been shown to be 50 mK. An investigation of transients that accompany photoacoustic waves generated by pulsed lasers has been carried out. Experiments have shown the existence of the transients, and a theory based on rapid heat diffusion has been developed. The photoacoustic effect in one dimension is known to increase without bound (in the linear acoustics regime) when an optical beam moves in a fluid at the sound speed. A solution to the wave equation for pressure has been found that describes the photoacoustic effect in a cell where an infrared optical grating moves at the sound speed. It was shown that the amplification effect exists along with a cavity resonance that can be used to great advantage in trace gas detection. The theory of the photoacoustic effect in a structure where the acoustic properties periodically vary in a one-dimensional based has been formulated based on solutions to a Mathieu equation. It was found that it is possible to excite photoacoustic waves withinmore » the band gaps to produce large amplitude acoustic waves. The idea of self-oscillation in a photoacoustic cell using a continuous laser has been investigated. A theory has been completed showing that in a compressive wave, the absorption increases as a result of the density increase leading to further absorption and hence an increased amplitude photoacoustic effect with the result that in a resonator, self-oscillation can place. Experiments have been carried out where irradiation of a suspension of absorbing carbon particles with a high power laser has been shown to result in cavitation luminescence. That is, following generation of CO and H 2 from the carbon particles through the carbon-steam reaction, an expanding gas bubble is produced, which during the phase where the bubble collapses, a sonoluminescent flash is produced. Work on the voltage generated by a spherical, colloidal object irradiated with an acoustic wave has been determined. The theory of X-ray imaging using a grating to generate a spatially heterodyned image has been formulated. The properties of X-ray images taken with a grating placed before the object and the resulting image Fourier transformed and filtered has been determined. The method essentially heterodynes the spatial component of the object in the image which can be used to eliminate scatter that degrades contrast. Another area of investigation is the motion of the components in a separation method known as thermal diffusion, or the Soret effect. By exploring the mathematics of the effect, it was found that the underlying mechanism of the separation is propagation of a shock whose features are masked typically by the effects of viscosity.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1352336
Report Number(s):
DE-SC0001082
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0001082
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
46 INSTRUMENTATION RELATED TO NUCLEAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY; photoacoustic; optoacoustic; Soret; thermal diffusion; X-ray; cavitation

Citation Formats

Diebold, Gerald J. Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352336.
Diebold, Gerald J. Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure. United States. doi:10.2172/1352336.
Diebold, Gerald J. Fri . "Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure". United States. doi:10.2172/1352336. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352336.
@article{osti_1352336,
title = {Sensitive Detection: Photoacoustics, Thermography, and Optical Radiation Pressure},
author = {Diebold, Gerald J.},
abstractNote = {Research during the granting period has been carried out in several areas concerned with sensitive detection. An infrared pyrometer based on the photoacoustic effect has been developed. The sensitivity of this instrument to temperature differentials has been shown to be 50 mK. An investigation of transients that accompany photoacoustic waves generated by pulsed lasers has been carried out. Experiments have shown the existence of the transients, and a theory based on rapid heat diffusion has been developed. The photoacoustic effect in one dimension is known to increase without bound (in the linear acoustics regime) when an optical beam moves in a fluid at the sound speed. A solution to the wave equation for pressure has been found that describes the photoacoustic effect in a cell where an infrared optical grating moves at the sound speed. It was shown that the amplification effect exists along with a cavity resonance that can be used to great advantage in trace gas detection. The theory of the photoacoustic effect in a structure where the acoustic properties periodically vary in a one-dimensional based has been formulated based on solutions to a Mathieu equation. It was found that it is possible to excite photoacoustic waves within the band gaps to produce large amplitude acoustic waves. The idea of self-oscillation in a photoacoustic cell using a continuous laser has been investigated. A theory has been completed showing that in a compressive wave, the absorption increases as a result of the density increase leading to further absorption and hence an increased amplitude photoacoustic effect with the result that in a resonator, self-oscillation can place. Experiments have been carried out where irradiation of a suspension of absorbing carbon particles with a high power laser has been shown to result in cavitation luminescence. That is, following generation of CO and H2 from the carbon particles through the carbon-steam reaction, an expanding gas bubble is produced, which during the phase where the bubble collapses, a sonoluminescent flash is produced. Work on the voltage generated by a spherical, colloidal object irradiated with an acoustic wave has been determined. The theory of X-ray imaging using a grating to generate a spatially heterodyned image has been formulated. The properties of X-ray images taken with a grating placed before the object and the resulting image Fourier transformed and filtered has been determined. The method essentially heterodynes the spatial component of the object in the image which can be used to eliminate scatter that degrades contrast. Another area of investigation is the motion of the components in a separation method known as thermal diffusion, or the Soret effect. By exploring the mathematics of the effect, it was found that the underlying mechanism of the separation is propagation of a shock whose features are masked typically by the effects of viscosity.},
doi = {10.2172/1352336},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {2017},
month = {4}
}