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Title: Factors Influencing Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in China

Abstract

This research project was designed to fill a critical void in our understanding of the state of energy research and innovation in China. It seeks to provide a comprehensive review and accounting of the various elements of the Chinese government and non-governmental sectors (commercial, university, research institutes) that are engaged in energy-related R&D and various aspects of energy innovation, including specific programs and projects designed to promote renewable energy innovation and energy conservation. The project provides an interrelated descriptive, statistical, and econometric account of China's overall energy innovation activities and capabilities, spanning the full economy with a particular focus on the dynamic industrial sector.

Authors:
 [1];  [2]
  1. Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
  2. Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1352305
Report Number(s):
SC0000908 Final Report
DOE Contract Number:
SC0000908
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; Energy; Innovation; Efficiency; China

Citation Formats

Fisher-Vanden, Karen, and Jefferson, Gary. Factors Influencing Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in China. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352305.
Fisher-Vanden, Karen, & Jefferson, Gary. Factors Influencing Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in China. United States. doi:10.2172/1352305.
Fisher-Vanden, Karen, and Jefferson, Gary. 2017. "Factors Influencing Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in China". United States. doi:10.2172/1352305. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352305.
@article{osti_1352305,
title = {Factors Influencing Energy Use and Carbon Emissions in China},
author = {Fisher-Vanden, Karen and Jefferson, Gary},
abstractNote = {This research project was designed to fill a critical void in our understanding of the state of energy research and innovation in China. It seeks to provide a comprehensive review and accounting of the various elements of the Chinese government and non-governmental sectors (commercial, university, research institutes) that are engaged in energy-related R&D and various aspects of energy innovation, including specific programs and projects designed to promote renewable energy innovation and energy conservation. The project provides an interrelated descriptive, statistical, and econometric account of China's overall energy innovation activities and capabilities, spanning the full economy with a particular focus on the dynamic industrial sector.},
doi = {10.2172/1352305},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 4
}

Technical Report:

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