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Title: Innovative computational tools for reducing exploration risk through integration of water-rock interactions and magnetotelluric surveys

Abstract

Mapping permeability distributions in geothermal reservoirs is essential for reducing the cost of geothermal development. To avoid the cost and sampling bias of measuring permeability directly through drilling, we require remote methods of imaging permeability such as geophysics. Electrical resistivity (or its inverse, conductivity) is one of the most sensitive geophysical properties known to reflect long range fluid interconnection and thus the likelihood of permeability. Perhaps the most widely applied geophysical methods for imaging subsurface resistivity is magnetotellurics (MT) due to its relatively great penetration depths. A primary goal of this project is to confirm through ground truthing at existing geothermal systems that MT resistivity structure interpreted integratively is capable of revealing permeable fluid pathways into geothermal systems.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1352203
Report Number(s):
DE-EE0005521
DOE Contract Number:
EE0005521
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
15 GEOTHERMAL ENERGY; GEOTHERMAL FIELDS; STABLE ISOTOPES; MAGNETOTELLURIC SURVEYS; THERMO HOT SPRINGS; COSO; LIGHTNING DOCK; RAFT RIVER

Citation Formats

Moore, Joseph. Innovative computational tools for reducing exploration risk through integration of water-rock interactions and magnetotelluric surveys. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1352203.
Moore, Joseph. Innovative computational tools for reducing exploration risk through integration of water-rock interactions and magnetotelluric surveys. United States. doi:10.2172/1352203.
Moore, Joseph. Thu . "Innovative computational tools for reducing exploration risk through integration of water-rock interactions and magnetotelluric surveys". United States. doi:10.2172/1352203. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352203.
@article{osti_1352203,
title = {Innovative computational tools for reducing exploration risk through integration of water-rock interactions and magnetotelluric surveys},
author = {Moore, Joseph},
abstractNote = {Mapping permeability distributions in geothermal reservoirs is essential for reducing the cost of geothermal development. To avoid the cost and sampling bias of measuring permeability directly through drilling, we require remote methods of imaging permeability such as geophysics. Electrical resistivity (or its inverse, conductivity) is one of the most sensitive geophysical properties known to reflect long range fluid interconnection and thus the likelihood of permeability. Perhaps the most widely applied geophysical methods for imaging subsurface resistivity is magnetotellurics (MT) due to its relatively great penetration depths. A primary goal of this project is to confirm through ground truthing at existing geothermal systems that MT resistivity structure interpreted integratively is capable of revealing permeable fluid pathways into geothermal systems.},
doi = {10.2172/1352203},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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