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Title: Bringing "The Moth" to light: A planet-sculpting scenario for the HD 61005 debris disk

Abstract

Here, the HD 61005 debris disk ("The Moth") stands out from the growing collection of spatially resolved circumstellar disks by virtue of its unusual swept-back morphology, brightness asymmetries, and dust ring offset. Despite several suggestions for the physical mechanisms creating these features, no definitive answer has been found. In this work, we demonstrate the plausibility of a scenario in which the disk material is shaped dynamically by an eccentric, inclined planet. We present new Keck NIRC2 scattered-light angular differential imaging of the disk at 1.2–2.3 μm that further constrains its outer morphology (projected separations of 27–135 au). We also present complementary Gemini Planet Imager 1.6 μm total intensity and polarized light detections that probe down to projected separations less than 10 au. To test our planet-sculpting hypothesis, we employed secular perturbation theory to construct parent body and dust distributions that informed scattered-light models. We found that this method produced models with morphological and photometric features similar to those seen in the data, supporting the premise of a planet-perturbed disk. Briefly, our results indicate a disk parent body population with a semimajor axis of 40–52 au and an interior planet with an eccentricity of at least 0.2. Many permutations of planetmore » mass and semimajor axis are allowed, ranging from an Earth mass at 35 au to a Jupiter mass at 5 au.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]; ORCiD logo [2];  [3];  [4]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [5]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [6]; ORCiD logo [7]; ORCiD logo [8];  [9]; ORCiD logo [3]; ORCiD logo [10]; ORCiD logo [11]; ORCiD logo [12]; ORCiD logo [13]; ORCiD logo [14];  [14]; ORCiD logo [15] more »; ORCiD logo [16];  [12]; ORCiD logo [17] « less
  1. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  2. Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)
  3. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)
  4. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States)
  5. Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Univ. Grenoble Alpes/CNRS, Grenoble (France)
  6. Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada)
  7. SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States); Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  8. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  9. Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)
  10. Univ. of Victoria, Victoria, BC (Canada); National Research Council of Canada Herzberg, Victoria, BC (Canada)
  11. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States)
  12. SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA (United States)
  13. Univ. of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada); Stony Brook Univ., Stony Brook, NY (United States)
  14. Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)
  15. Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)
  16. Gemini Observatory, La Serena (Chile)
  17. Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1352118
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-717747
Journal ID: ISSN 1538-3881
Grant/Contract Number:
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Astronomical Journal (Online)
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Name: Astronomical Journal (Online); Journal Volume: 152; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 1538-3881
Publisher:
IOP Publishing
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; infrared: planetary systems; planet; disk interactions; stars: individual (HD 61005); techniques:high angular resolution; techniques: polarimetric

Citation Formats

Esposito, Thomas M., Fitzgerald, Michael P., Graham, James R., Kalas, Paul, Lee, Eve J., Chiang, Eugene, Duchêne, Gaspard, Wang, Jason, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Nielsen, Eric, Ammons, S. Mark, Bruzzone, Sebastian, De Rosa, Robert J., Draper, Zachary H., Macintosh, Bruce, Marchis, Franck, Metchev, Stanimir A., Perrin, Marshall, Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Vega, David, and Wolff, Schuyler. Bringing "The Moth" to light: A planet-sculpting scenario for the HD 61005 debris disk. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/4/85.
Esposito, Thomas M., Fitzgerald, Michael P., Graham, James R., Kalas, Paul, Lee, Eve J., Chiang, Eugene, Duchêne, Gaspard, Wang, Jason, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Nielsen, Eric, Ammons, S. Mark, Bruzzone, Sebastian, De Rosa, Robert J., Draper, Zachary H., Macintosh, Bruce, Marchis, Franck, Metchev, Stanimir A., Perrin, Marshall, Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Vega, David, & Wolff, Schuyler. Bringing "The Moth" to light: A planet-sculpting scenario for the HD 61005 debris disk. United States. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/4/85.
Esposito, Thomas M., Fitzgerald, Michael P., Graham, James R., Kalas, Paul, Lee, Eve J., Chiang, Eugene, Duchêne, Gaspard, Wang, Jason, Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A., Nielsen, Eric, Ammons, S. Mark, Bruzzone, Sebastian, De Rosa, Robert J., Draper, Zachary H., Macintosh, Bruce, Marchis, Franck, Metchev, Stanimir A., Perrin, Marshall, Pueyo, Laurent, Rajan, Abhijith, Rantakyrö, Fredrik T., Vega, David, and Wolff, Schuyler. 2016. "Bringing "The Moth" to light: A planet-sculpting scenario for the HD 61005 debris disk". United States. doi:10.3847/0004-6256/152/4/85. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1352118.
@article{osti_1352118,
title = {Bringing "The Moth" to light: A planet-sculpting scenario for the HD 61005 debris disk},
author = {Esposito, Thomas M. and Fitzgerald, Michael P. and Graham, James R. and Kalas, Paul and Lee, Eve J. and Chiang, Eugene and Duchêne, Gaspard and Wang, Jason and Millar-Blanchaer, Maxwell A. and Nielsen, Eric and Ammons, S. Mark and Bruzzone, Sebastian and De Rosa, Robert J. and Draper, Zachary H. and Macintosh, Bruce and Marchis, Franck and Metchev, Stanimir A. and Perrin, Marshall and Pueyo, Laurent and Rajan, Abhijith and Rantakyrö, Fredrik T. and Vega, David and Wolff, Schuyler},
abstractNote = {Here, the HD 61005 debris disk ("The Moth") stands out from the growing collection of spatially resolved circumstellar disks by virtue of its unusual swept-back morphology, brightness asymmetries, and dust ring offset. Despite several suggestions for the physical mechanisms creating these features, no definitive answer has been found. In this work, we demonstrate the plausibility of a scenario in which the disk material is shaped dynamically by an eccentric, inclined planet. We present new Keck NIRC2 scattered-light angular differential imaging of the disk at 1.2–2.3 μm that further constrains its outer morphology (projected separations of 27–135 au). We also present complementary Gemini Planet Imager 1.6 μm total intensity and polarized light detections that probe down to projected separations less than 10 au. To test our planet-sculpting hypothesis, we employed secular perturbation theory to construct parent body and dust distributions that informed scattered-light models. We found that this method produced models with morphological and photometric features similar to those seen in the data, supporting the premise of a planet-perturbed disk. Briefly, our results indicate a disk parent body population with a semimajor axis of 40–52 au and an interior planet with an eccentricity of at least 0.2. Many permutations of planet mass and semimajor axis are allowed, ranging from an Earth mass at 35 au to a Jupiter mass at 5 au.},
doi = {10.3847/0004-6256/152/4/85},
journal = {Astronomical Journal (Online)},
number = 4,
volume = 152,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

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