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Title: Nanoscale measurement of trace element distributions in Spartina alterniflora root tissue during dormancy

Abstract

Here, this article reports a nanometer-scale investigation of trace element (As, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, S and Zn) distributions in the root system Spartina alterniflora during dormancy. The sample was collected on a salt marsh island in Jamaica Bay, New York, in April 2015 and the root was cross-sectioned with 10 μm resolution. Synchrotron X-ray nanofluorescence was applied to map the trace element distributions in selected areas of the root epidermis and endodermis. The sampling resolution was 60 nm to increase the measurement accuracy and reduce the uncertainty. The results indicate that the elemental concentrations in the epidermis, outer endodermis and inner endodermis are significantly (p < 0.01) different. The root endodermis has relatively higher concentrations of these elements than the root epidermis. Furthermore, this high resolution measurement indicates that the elemental concentrations in the outer endodermis are significantly (p < 0.01) higher than those in the inner endodermis. These results suggest that the Casparian strip may play a role in governing the aplastic transport of these elements. Pearson correlation analysis on the average concentrations of each element in the selected areas shows that most of the elements are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated, which suggests that thesemore » elements may share the same transport pathways.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6]
  1. Montclair State Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Earth and Environmental Studies
  2. State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stony Brook, NY (United States). School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
  3. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II)
  4. Shenyang Agricultural Univ. (China). College of Land and Environment
  5. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Computational Science Center
  6. Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Biological Sciences Dept.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22); National Science Foundation (NSF); China Scholarship Council
OSTI Identifier:
1351732
Report Number(s):
BNL-113720-2017-JA
Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Grant/Contract Number:
SC0012704; AC0298CH10886; MCB-1051675
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Scientific Reports
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2045-2322
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Feng, Huan, Qian, Yu, Cochran, J. Kirk, Zhu, Qingzhi, Hu, Wen, Yan, Hanfei, Li, Li, Huang, Xiaojing, Chu, Yong S., Liu, Houjun, Yoo, Shinjae, and Liu, Chang-Jun. Nanoscale measurement of trace element distributions in Spartina alterniflora root tissue during dormancy. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1038/srep40420.
Feng, Huan, Qian, Yu, Cochran, J. Kirk, Zhu, Qingzhi, Hu, Wen, Yan, Hanfei, Li, Li, Huang, Xiaojing, Chu, Yong S., Liu, Houjun, Yoo, Shinjae, & Liu, Chang-Jun. Nanoscale measurement of trace element distributions in Spartina alterniflora root tissue during dormancy. United States. doi:10.1038/srep40420.
Feng, Huan, Qian, Yu, Cochran, J. Kirk, Zhu, Qingzhi, Hu, Wen, Yan, Hanfei, Li, Li, Huang, Xiaojing, Chu, Yong S., Liu, Houjun, Yoo, Shinjae, and Liu, Chang-Jun. Wed . "Nanoscale measurement of trace element distributions in Spartina alterniflora root tissue during dormancy". United States. doi:10.1038/srep40420. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351732.
@article{osti_1351732,
title = {Nanoscale measurement of trace element distributions in Spartina alterniflora root tissue during dormancy},
author = {Feng, Huan and Qian, Yu and Cochran, J. Kirk and Zhu, Qingzhi and Hu, Wen and Yan, Hanfei and Li, Li and Huang, Xiaojing and Chu, Yong S. and Liu, Houjun and Yoo, Shinjae and Liu, Chang-Jun},
abstractNote = {Here, this article reports a nanometer-scale investigation of trace element (As, Ca, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni, S and Zn) distributions in the root system Spartina alterniflora during dormancy. The sample was collected on a salt marsh island in Jamaica Bay, New York, in April 2015 and the root was cross-sectioned with 10 μm resolution. Synchrotron X-ray nanofluorescence was applied to map the trace element distributions in selected areas of the root epidermis and endodermis. The sampling resolution was 60 nm to increase the measurement accuracy and reduce the uncertainty. The results indicate that the elemental concentrations in the epidermis, outer endodermis and inner endodermis are significantly (p < 0.01) different. The root endodermis has relatively higher concentrations of these elements than the root epidermis. Furthermore, this high resolution measurement indicates that the elemental concentrations in the outer endodermis are significantly (p < 0.01) higher than those in the inner endodermis. These results suggest that the Casparian strip may play a role in governing the aplastic transport of these elements. Pearson correlation analysis on the average concentrations of each element in the selected areas shows that most of the elements are significantly (p < 0.05) correlated, which suggests that these elements may share the same transport pathways.},
doi = {10.1038/srep40420},
journal = {Scientific Reports},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Jan 18 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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  • This study is focused on micro-scale measurement of metal (Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Zn) distributions in Spartina alterniflora root system. The root samples were collected in the Yangtze River intertidal zone in July 2013. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF), computed microtomography (CMT), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) techniques, which provide micro-meter scale analytical resolution, were applied to this study. Although it was found that the metals of interest were distributed in both epidermis and vascular tissue with the varying concentrations, the results showed that Fe plaque was mainly distributed in the root epidermis. Other metals (e.g.,more » Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) were correlated with Fe in the epidermis possibly due to scavenge by Fe plaque. Relatively high metal concentrations were observed in the root hair tip. As a result, this micro-scale investigation provides insights of understanding the metal uptake and spatial distribution as well as the function of Fe plaque governing metal transport in the root system.« less
  • This study is focused on micro-scale measurement of metal (Ca, Cl, Fe, K, Mn, Cu, Pb, and Zn) distributions in Spartina alterniflora root system. The root samples were collected in the Yangtze River intertidal zone in July 2013. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence (XRF), computed microtomography (CMT), and X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) techniques, which provide micro-meter scale analytical resolution, were applied to this study. Although it was found that the metals of interest were distributed in both epidermis and vascular tissue with the varying concentrations, the results showed that Fe plaque was mainly distributed in the root epidermis. Other metals (e.g.,more » Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) were correlated with Fe in the epidermis possibly due to scavenge by Fe plaque. Relatively high metal concentrations were observed in the root hair tip. As a result, this micro-scale investigation provides insights of understanding the metal uptake and spatial distribution as well as the function of Fe plaque governing metal transport in the root system.« less
  • The coupling of root-associated nitrogen fixation and plant photosynthesis was examined in the salt marsh grass Spartina alterniflora. In both field experiments and hydroponic assay chambers, nitrogen fixation associated with the roots was rapidly enhanced by stimulating plant photosynthesis. A kinetic analysis of acetylene reduction activity (ARA) showed that a five-to-sixfold stimulation occurred within 10 to 60 min after the plant leaves were exposed to light or increase CO/sub 2/ concentrations (with the light held constant). In field experiments, CO/sub 2/ enrichment increased plant-associated ARA by 27%. Further evidence of the dependence of ARA on plant photosynthate was obtained whenmore » activity in excised roots was shown to decrease after young greenhouse plants were placed in the dark. Seasonal variation in the ARA of excised plant roots from field cores appears to be related to the annual cycle of net photosynthesis in S. alterniflora.« less
  • Liberty State Park in New Jersey, USA, is a “brownfield” site containing various levels of contaminants. To investigate metal uptake and distributions in plants on the brownfield site, Phragmites australis and Typha latifolia were collected in Liberty State Park during the growing season (May–September) in 2011 at two sites with the high and low metal loads, respectively. The objective of this study was to understand the metal (Fe, Mn, Cu, Pb and Zn) concentration and spatial distributions in P. australis and T. latifolia root systems with micro-meter scale resolution using synchrotron X-ray microfluorescence (μXRF) and synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography (μCMT)more » techniques. The root structure measurement by synchrotron μCMT showed that high X-ray attenuation substance appeared in the epidermis. Synchrotron μXRF measurement showed that metal concentrations and distributions in the root cross-section between epidermis and vascular tissue were statistically different. Significant correlations were found between metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) and Fe in the epidermis, implying that metals were scavenged by Fe oxides. The results from this study suggest that the expression of metal transport and accumulation within the root systems may be element specific. The information derived from this study can improve our current knowledge of the wetland plant ecological function in brownfield remediation.« less