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Title: Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1351660
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Micron
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 88; Journal Issue: C; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-10-04 16:42:37; Journal ID: ISSN 0968-4328
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United Kingdom
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Panova, Ouliana, Chen, X. Chelsea, Bustillo, Karen C., Ophus, Colin, Bhatt, Mahesh P., Balsara, Nitash, and Minor, Andrew M.. Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction. United Kingdom: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.micron.2016.05.008.
Panova, Ouliana, Chen, X. Chelsea, Bustillo, Karen C., Ophus, Colin, Bhatt, Mahesh P., Balsara, Nitash, & Minor, Andrew M.. Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.micron.2016.05.008.
Panova, Ouliana, Chen, X. Chelsea, Bustillo, Karen C., Ophus, Colin, Bhatt, Mahesh P., Balsara, Nitash, and Minor, Andrew M.. 2016. "Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction". United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/j.micron.2016.05.008.
@article{osti_1351660,
title = {Orientation mapping of semicrystalline polymers using scanning electron nanobeam diffraction},
author = {Panova, Ouliana and Chen, X. Chelsea and Bustillo, Karen C. and Ophus, Colin and Bhatt, Mahesh P. and Balsara, Nitash and Minor, Andrew M.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1016/j.micron.2016.05.008},
journal = {Micron},
number = C,
volume = 88,
place = {United Kingdom},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1016/j.micron.2016.05.008

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  • A classical method used to characterize the strain in modern semiconductor devices is nanobeam diffraction (NBD) in the transmission electron microscope. One challenge for this method lies in the fact that the smaller the beam becomes, the more difficult it becomes to analyze the resulting diffraction spot pattern. We show that a carefully designed fitting algorithm enables us to reduce the sampling area for the diffraction patterns on the camera chip dramatically (∼1/16) compared to traditional settings without significant loss of precision. The resulting lower magnification of the spot pattern permits the presence of an annular dark field detector, whichmore » in turn makes the recording of images for drift correction during NBD acquisition possible. Thus, the reduced sampling size allows acquisition of drift corrected NBD 2D strain maps of up to 3000 pixels while maintaining a precision of better than 0.07%. As an example, we show NBD strain maps of a modern field effect transistor (FET) device. A special filtering feature used in the analysis makes it is possible to measure strain in silicon devices even in the presence of other crystalline materials covering the probed area, which is important for the characterization of the next generation of devices (Fin-FETs).« less
  • The atomic structures of 124 single-walled carbon nanotubes, described by their diameter and helicity or equivalently by the two chiral indices (u,v) that define the perimeter of each nanotube, have been determined unambiguously by nanobeam electron diffraction. A mapping of 70 possible nanotubes in the range of 1.20-1.65 nm in diameter with all possible helicities has been constructed experimentally for a carbon nanotube sample produced by arc discharge. Among the total 124 nanotubes characterized experimentally, 58 nanotubes of different structure have been identified. By examining the histogram of occurring helicities, we find that, while certain nanotubes were observed slightly moremore » often than others, the overall feature showed a rather uniform distribution in occurrence. Basing on a nucleation-and-growth model, we suggest that the uniform distribution of helicity be originated from the weak dependence on helicity of the formation energy of carbon nanotubes, while the growth prefers slightly the structure with helicity 15 deg. -30 deg. for which the addition of carbon dimers would facilitate the growth of carbon nanotubes.« less
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  • This study undertook strain analysis on fin-shaped field effect transistor structures with epitaxial Si{sub 1−x}Ge{sub x} stressors, using nano-beam electron diffraction and finite elements method. Combining the two methods disclosed dynamic strain distribution in the source/drain and channel region of the fin structure, and the effects of dimensional factors such as the stressor thickness and fin width, offering valuable information for device design.