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Title: Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles

Abstract

In order to provide the scientific foundation to enable technology breakthroughs in transportation fuel, it is important to develop a combustion modeling capability to optimize the operation and design of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The goal of this proposal is to develop a validated predictive model to describe the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles in premixed and diffusion flames. Atomistic studies in conjunction with state-of-the-art experiments are the distinguishing characteristics of this unique interdisciplinary effort. The modeling effort has been conducted at the University of Michigan by Prof. A. Violi. The experimental work has entailed a series of studies using different techniques to analyze gas-phase soot precursor chemistry and soot particle production in premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements have provided spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other gas-phase species and size and composition of incipient soot nanoparticles for comparison with model results. The experimental team includes Dr. N. Hansen and H. Michelsen at Sandia National Labs' Combustion Research Facility, and Dr. K. Wilson as collaborator at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source. Our results show that the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles affect the coagulation behavior in soot formation, and our results onmore » an experimentally validated, predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles will not only enhance our understanding of soot formation since but will also allow the prediction of particle size distributions under combustion conditions. These results provide a novel description of soot formation based on physical and chemical properties of the particles for use in the next generation of soot models and an enhanced capability for facilitating the design of alternative fuels and the engines they will power.« less

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [2];  [2];  [3]
  1. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  2. Sandia National Lab. (SNL-CA), Livermore, CA (United States)
  3. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1351404
Report Number(s):
DOE-MICHIGAN-ER-16112
7346156448
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0002619
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Violi, Angela, Michelsen, Hope, Hansen, Nils, and Wilson, Kevin. Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1351404.
Violi, Angela, Michelsen, Hope, Hansen, Nils, & Wilson, Kevin. Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles. United States. doi:10.2172/1351404.
Violi, Angela, Michelsen, Hope, Hansen, Nils, and Wilson, Kevin. Fri . "Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles". United States. doi:10.2172/1351404. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351404.
@article{osti_1351404,
title = {Developing a predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles},
author = {Violi, Angela and Michelsen, Hope and Hansen, Nils and Wilson, Kevin},
abstractNote = {In order to provide the scientific foundation to enable technology breakthroughs in transportation fuel, it is important to develop a combustion modeling capability to optimize the operation and design of evolving fuels in advanced engines for transportation applications. The goal of this proposal is to develop a validated predictive model to describe the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles in premixed and diffusion flames. Atomistic studies in conjunction with state-of-the-art experiments are the distinguishing characteristics of this unique interdisciplinary effort. The modeling effort has been conducted at the University of Michigan by Prof. A. Violi. The experimental work has entailed a series of studies using different techniques to analyze gas-phase soot precursor chemistry and soot particle production in premixed and diffusion flames. Measurements have provided spatial distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other gas-phase species and size and composition of incipient soot nanoparticles for comparison with model results. The experimental team includes Dr. N. Hansen and H. Michelsen at Sandia National Labs' Combustion Research Facility, and Dr. K. Wilson as collaborator at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab's Advanced Light Source. Our results show that the chemical and physical properties of nanoparticles affect the coagulation behavior in soot formation, and our results on an experimentally validated, predictive model for the chemical composition of soot nanoparticles will not only enhance our understanding of soot formation since but will also allow the prediction of particle size distributions under combustion conditions. These results provide a novel description of soot formation based on physical and chemical properties of the particles for use in the next generation of soot models and an enhanced capability for facilitating the design of alternative fuels and the engines they will power.},
doi = {10.2172/1351404},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Fri Apr 07 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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