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Title: Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses

Abstract

The host innate immune system serves as the first line of defense against viral infections. Germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors detect molecular patterns associated with pathogens and activate innate immune responses. Of particular relevance to viral infections are those pattern recognition receptors that activate type I interferon responses, which establish an antiviral state. The order Mononegavirales is composed of viruses that possess single-stranded, non-segmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA genomes and are important human pathogens that consistently antagonize signaling related to type I interferon responses. NNS viruses have limited encoding capacity compared to many DNA viruses, and as a likely consequence, most open reading frames encode multifunctional viral proteins that interact with host factors in order to evade host cell defenses while promoting viral replication. In this review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of innate immune evasion by select NNS viruses. A greater understanding of these interactions will be critical in facilitating the development of effective therapeutics and viral countermeasures.

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
DODNIH
OSTI Identifier:
1351396
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Molecular Biology; Journal Volume: 428; Journal Issue: 17
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; 60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Chatterjee, Srirupa, Basler, Christopher F., Amarasinghe, Gaya K., and Leung, Daisy W. Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2016.07.017.
Chatterjee, Srirupa, Basler, Christopher F., Amarasinghe, Gaya K., & Leung, Daisy W. Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses. United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2016.07.017.
Chatterjee, Srirupa, Basler, Christopher F., Amarasinghe, Gaya K., and Leung, Daisy W. Mon . "Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses". United States. doi:10.1016/j.jmb.2016.07.017.
@article{osti_1351396,
title = {Molecular Mechanisms of Innate Immune Inhibition by Non-Segmented Negative-Sense RNA Viruses},
author = {Chatterjee, Srirupa and Basler, Christopher F. and Amarasinghe, Gaya K. and Leung, Daisy W.},
abstractNote = {The host innate immune system serves as the first line of defense against viral infections. Germline-encoded pattern recognition receptors detect molecular patterns associated with pathogens and activate innate immune responses. Of particular relevance to viral infections are those pattern recognition receptors that activate type I interferon responses, which establish an antiviral state. The order Mononegavirales is composed of viruses that possess single-stranded, non-segmented negative-sense (NNS) RNA genomes and are important human pathogens that consistently antagonize signaling related to type I interferon responses. NNS viruses have limited encoding capacity compared to many DNA viruses, and as a likely consequence, most open reading frames encode multifunctional viral proteins that interact with host factors in order to evade host cell defenses while promoting viral replication. In this review, we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of innate immune evasion by select NNS viruses. A greater understanding of these interactions will be critical in facilitating the development of effective therapeutics and viral countermeasures.},
doi = {10.1016/j.jmb.2016.07.017},
journal = {Journal of Molecular Biology},
number = 17,
volume = 428,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Mon Aug 01 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}
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