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Title: Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements

Authors:
; ; ; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NSFNIH
OSTI Identifier:
1351348
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: BMC Structural Biology (Online); Journal Volume: 16; Journal Issue: 1
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Handa, Sumit, Paul, Blair G., Miller, Jeffery F., Valentine, David L., and Ghosh, Partho. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1186/s12900-016-0064-6.
Handa, Sumit, Paul, Blair G., Miller, Jeffery F., Valentine, David L., & Ghosh, Partho. Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements. United States. doi:10.1186/s12900-016-0064-6.
Handa, Sumit, Paul, Blair G., Miller, Jeffery F., Valentine, David L., and Ghosh, Partho. 2016. "Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements". United States. doi:10.1186/s12900-016-0064-6.
@article{osti_1351348,
title = {Conservation of the C-type lectin fold for accommodating massive sequence variation in archaeal diversity-generating retroelements},
author = {Handa, Sumit and Paul, Blair G. and Miller, Jeffery F. and Valentine, David L. and Ghosh, Partho},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1186/s12900-016-0064-6},
journal = {BMC Structural Biology (Online)},
number = 1,
volume = 16,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}
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