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Title: Planning Electric Transmission Lines: A Review of Recent Regional Transmission Plans

Abstract

The first Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) recommends that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conduct a national review of transmission plans and assess the barriers and incentives to their implementation. DOE tasked Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to prepare two reports to support the agency’s response to this recommendation. This report reviews regional transmission plans and regional transmission planning processes that have been directed by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order Nos. 890 and 1000. We focus on the most recent regional transmission plans (those issued in 2015 and through approximately mid-year 2016) and current regional transmission planning processes. A companion report focuses on non-plan-related factors that affect transmission projects.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability (OE)
OSTI Identifier:
1351315
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1006331Rev.
ir:1006331-Rev.
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION

Citation Formats

Eto, Joseph H. Planning Electric Transmission Lines: A Review of Recent Regional Transmission Plans. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1351315.
Eto, Joseph H. Planning Electric Transmission Lines: A Review of Recent Regional Transmission Plans. United States. doi:10.2172/1351315.
Eto, Joseph H. Thu . "Planning Electric Transmission Lines: A Review of Recent Regional Transmission Plans". United States. doi:10.2172/1351315. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351315.
@article{osti_1351315,
title = {Planning Electric Transmission Lines: A Review of Recent Regional Transmission Plans},
author = {Eto, Joseph H.},
abstractNote = {The first Quadrennial Energy Review (QER) recommends that the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) conduct a national review of transmission plans and assess the barriers and incentives to their implementation. DOE tasked Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to prepare two reports to support the agency’s response to this recommendation. This report reviews regional transmission plans and regional transmission planning processes that have been directed by Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) Order Nos. 890 and 1000. We focus on the most recent regional transmission plans (those issued in 2015 and through approximately mid-year 2016) and current regional transmission planning processes. A companion report focuses on non-plan-related factors that affect transmission projects.},
doi = {10.2172/1351315},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 13 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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