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Title: KDHE POroject Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LBD/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in January-June 2016

Abstract

In 2008-2009, to address the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected on its former property, the CCC/USDA implemented a source area cleanup in accord with the document Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for Agra, Kansas (IMWP/D; Argonne 2008). The cleanup involves five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparge (AS) systems. The work plan was approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in November 2008 (KDHE 2008b), and operation began in May 2009.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA); USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1351294
Report Number(s):
ANL/EVS/AGEM/CHRON-2042
131780
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-06CH11357
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

LaFreniere, Lorraine M. KDHE POroject Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LBD/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in January-June 2016. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.2172/1351294.
LaFreniere, Lorraine M. KDHE POroject Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LBD/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in January-June 2016. United States. doi:10.2172/1351294.
LaFreniere, Lorraine M. 2016. "KDHE POroject Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LBD/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in January-June 2016". United States. doi:10.2172/1351294. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351294.
@article{osti_1351294,
title = {KDHE POroject Code: C6-074-00002: Progress and Monitoring Report for the LBD/SVE/AS System at the Former CCC/USDA Grain Storage Facility, Agra, Kansas, in January-June 2016},
author = {LaFreniere, Lorraine M.},
abstractNote = {In 2008-2009, to address the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected on its former property, the CCC/USDA implemented a source area cleanup in accord with the document Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for Agra, Kansas (IMWP/D; Argonne 2008). The cleanup involves five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparge (AS) systems. The work plan was approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in November 2008 (KDHE 2008b), and operation began in May 2009.},
doi = {10.2172/1351294},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}

Technical Report:

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  • In 2008-2009, to address the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected on its former property, the CCC/USDA implemented a source area cleanup in accord with the document Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for Agra, Kansas (IMWP/D; Argonne 2008). The cleanup involves five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparge (AS) systems. The work plan was approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in November 2008 (KDHE 2008b), and operation began in May 2009.
  • In 2008-2009, to address the carbon tetrachloride contamination detected on its former property, the CCC/USDA implemented a source area cleanup in accord with the document Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for Agra, Kansas (IMWP/D; Argonne 2008). The cleanup involves five large-diameter boreholes (LDBs) coupled with soil vapor extraction (SVE) and air sparging (AS). The work plan was approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) in November 2008 (KDHE 2008b), and operation began in May 2009.
  • The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) operated a grain storage facility at Agra, Kansas, from the 1950s to the early 1970s. No structures remain on the property, and the land is used for agricultural purposes, specifically wheat production. The property is currently owned by the Kyle Railroad Co. and is leased to Mr. Herb VanEaton. The Pro-Ag Marketing grain storage facility is directly south of the former CCC/USDA facility. Quarterly progress reports for October-December 2008, January-March 2009, and April- June 2009 (Argonne 2009a,b,c) provided detailed information regarding construction and startup of the cleanup. Previous periodicmore » monitoring reports (Argonne 2010a,b,c,d, 2011a,b,c, 2012, 2013a,b,c, 2014a,b) have tracked the subsequent progress of the cleanup effort. Data for evaluation of system performance are collected primarily by sampling SVE effluents, soil gas monitoring points, and groundwater wells for analysis for volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Table 1.1 provides a detailed chronological summary of activities during implementation of the cleanup.« less
  • In October, 2007, the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) presented the document Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) to the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Environmental Remediation (KDHE/BER), for a proposed non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former CCC/USDA grain storage facility in Centralia, Kansas (Figure 1.1). The IM was recommended to mitigate existing levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and in the groundwater beneath and in the vicinity of the former facility, as well as to moderate or decreasemore » the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in the groundwater. The Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) was developed in accordance with the KDHE/BER Policy No.BERRS-029, Policy and Scope of Work: Interim Measures (KDHE 1996). The hydrogeologic, geochemical, and contaminant distribution characteristics of the Centralia site, as identified by the CCC/USDA, factored into the development of the nonemergency IM proposal. These characteristics were summarized in the Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007a) and were discussed in detail in previous Argonne reports (Argonne 2002a, 2003, 2004, 2005a,b,c, 2006a,b, 2007b). The identified remedial goals of the proposed IM were as follows: (1) To reduce the existing concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater in three 'hot spot' areas identified at the site (at SB01, SB05, and SB12-MW02; Figure 1.2) to levels acceptable to the KDHE. (2) To reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the soils near the location of former soil boring SB12 and existing monitoring well MW02 (Figure 1.2) to levels below the KDHE Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) of 200 {micro}g/kg for this contaminant. To address these goals, the potential application of an in situ chemical reduction (ISCR) treatment technology, employing the use of the EHC{reg_sign} treatment materials marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc. (Freeport, Illinois), was recommended. The EHC materials are proprietary mixtures of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron that are injected into the subsurface as a slurry (EHC) or in dissolved form (EHC-A) and subsequently released slowly into the formation. The materials are designed to create highly reducing geochemical conditions in the vadose and saturated zones that foster both thermodynamic and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride.« less
  • This document presents an Interim Measure Work Plan/Design for the short-term, field-scale pilot testing and subsequent implementation of a non-emergency Interim Measure (IM) at the site of the former grain storage facility operated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in Centralia, Kansas. The IM is recommended to mitigate both (1) localized carbon tetrachloride contamination in the vadose zone soils beneath the former facility and (2) present (and potentially future) carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the shallow groundwater beneath and in the immediate vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Investigations conducted on behalf of themore » CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory have demonstrated that groundwater at the Centralia site is contaminated with carbon tetrachloride at levels that exceed the Kansas Tier 2 Risk-Based Screening Level (RBSL) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's maximum contaminant level of 5.0 {micro}g/L for this compound. Groundwater sampling and analyses conducted by Argonne under a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE) indicated that the carbon tetrachloride levels at several locations in the groundwater plume have increased since twice yearly monitoring of the site began in September 2005. The identified groundwater contamination currently poses no unacceptable health risks, in view of the absence of potential human receptors in the vicinity of the former CCC/USDA facility. Carbon tetrachloride contamination has also been identified at Centralia in subsurface soils at concentrations on the order of the Kansas Tier 2 RBSL of 200 {micro}g/kg in soil for the soil-to-groundwater protection pathway. Soils contaminated at this level might pose some risk as a potential source of carbon tetrachloride contamination to groundwater. To mitigate the existing contaminant levels and decrease the potential future concentrations of carbon tetrachloride in groundwater and soil, the CCC/USDA recommends initial short-term, field-scale pilot testing of a remedial approach that employs in situ chemical reduction (ISCR), in the form of a commercially available material marketed by Adventus Americas, Inc., Freeport, Illinois (http://www.adventusgroup.com). If the pilot test is successful, it will be followed by a request for KDHE authorization of full implementation of the ISCR approach. In the recommended ISCR approach, the Adventus EHC{reg_sign} material--a proprietary mixture of food-grade organic carbon and zero-valent iron--is introduced into the subsurface, where the components are released slowly into the formation. The compounds create highly reducing conditions in the saturated zone and the overlying vadose zone. These conditions foster chemical and biological reductive dechlorination of carbon tetrachloride. The anticipated effective lifetime of the EHC compounds following injection is 1-5 yr. Although ISCR is a relatively innovative remedial approach, the EHC technology has been demonstrated to be effective in the treatment of carbon tetrachloride contamination in groundwater and has been employed at a carbon tetrachloride contamination site elsewhere in Kansas (Cargill Flour Mill and Elevator, Wellington, Kansas; KDHE Project Code C209670158), with the approval of the KDHE. At Centralia, the CCC/USDA recommends use of the ISCR approach initially in a short-term pilot test addressing the elevated carbon tetrachloride levels identified in one of three persistently highly contaminated areas ('hot-spot areas') in the groundwater plume. In this test, a three-dimensional grid pattern of direct-push injection points will be used to distribute the EHC material (in slurry or aqueous form) throughout the volume of the contaminated aquifer and (in selected locations) the vadose zone in the selected hot-spot area. Injection of the EHC material will be conducted by a licensed contractor, under the supervision of Adventus and Argonne technical personnel. The contractor will be identified upon acceptance by the KDHE of the conceptual design presented here. In the pilot test, Argonne will install and periodically sample a network of temporary and permanent monitoring points to document (1) the contaminant distribution in the saturated and vadose zones prior to injection, (2) the distribution of the EHC material in these zones immediately following injection, and (3) subsequent changes in contaminant concentrations that occur over time in response to the imposed treatment. Argonne's investigations have shown that the lithologic properties of the unit hosting the contaminated aquifer at Centralia vary both vertically and laterally, resulting in a heterogeneous distribution of permeabilities and relatively restricted groundwater movement across much of the site.« less