skip to main content
OSTI.GOV title logo U.S. Department of Energy
Office of Scientific and Technical Information

Title: Predominance and metabolic potential of Halanaerobium spp. in produced water from hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale wells

Abstract

Here, microbial activity in the produced water from hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells may potentially interfere with hydrocarbon production and cause damage to the well and surface infrastructure via corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. In this study, we surveyed the microbial abundance and community structure of produced water sampled from 42 Marcellus Shale wells in southwestern Pennsylvania (well age ranged from 150 to 1,846 days) to better understand the microbial diversity of produced water. We sequenced the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene to assess taxonomy and utilized quantitative PCR (qPCR) to evaluate the microbial abundance across all 42 produced water samples. Bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales were found to be the most abundant organisms in the majority of the produced water samples, emphasizing their previously suggested role in hydraulic fracturing-related microbial activity. Statistical analyses identified correlations between well age and biocide formulation and the microbial community, in particular, the relative abundance of Halanaerobiales. We further investigated the role of members of the order Halanaerobiales in produced water by reconstructing and annotating a Halanaerobium draft genome (named MDAL1), using shotgun metagenomic sequencing and metagenomic binning. The recovered draft genome was found to be closely related to the speciesmore » H. congolense, an oil field isolate, and Halanaerobium sp. strain T82-1, also recovered from hydraulic fracturing produced water. Reconstruction of metabolic pathways revealed Halanaerobium sp. strain MDAL1 to have the potential for acid production, thiosulfate reduction, and biofilm formation, suggesting it to have the ability to contribute to corrosion, souring, and biofouling events in the hydraulic fracturing infrastructure.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [2];  [4];  [4]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  3. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA (United States); AECOM, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
  4. National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Pittsburgh, PA, and Morgantown, WV (United States). In-house Research
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1351183
Report Number(s):
NETL-PUB-20135
Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240
Grant/Contract Number:  
RES1000027/183U
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Applied and Environmental Microbiology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 83; Journal Issue: 8; Journal ID: ISSN 0099-2240
Publisher:
American Society for Microbiology
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; Marcellus Shale; biogeochemistry

Citation Formats

Lipus, Daniel, Vikram, Amit, Ross, Daniel, Bain, Daniel, Gulliver, Djuna, Hammack, Richard, and Bibby, Kyle. Predominance and metabolic potential of Halanaerobium spp. in produced water from hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale wells. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1128/AEM.02659-16.
Lipus, Daniel, Vikram, Amit, Ross, Daniel, Bain, Daniel, Gulliver, Djuna, Hammack, Richard, & Bibby, Kyle. Predominance and metabolic potential of Halanaerobium spp. in produced water from hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale wells. United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.02659-16.
Lipus, Daniel, Vikram, Amit, Ross, Daniel, Bain, Daniel, Gulliver, Djuna, Hammack, Richard, and Bibby, Kyle. Fri . "Predominance and metabolic potential of Halanaerobium spp. in produced water from hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale wells". United States. doi:10.1128/AEM.02659-16. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351183.
@article{osti_1351183,
title = {Predominance and metabolic potential of Halanaerobium spp. in produced water from hydraulically fractured Marcellus Shale wells},
author = {Lipus, Daniel and Vikram, Amit and Ross, Daniel and Bain, Daniel and Gulliver, Djuna and Hammack, Richard and Bibby, Kyle},
abstractNote = {Here, microbial activity in the produced water from hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells may potentially interfere with hydrocarbon production and cause damage to the well and surface infrastructure via corrosion, sulfide release, and fouling. In this study, we surveyed the microbial abundance and community structure of produced water sampled from 42 Marcellus Shale wells in southwestern Pennsylvania (well age ranged from 150 to 1,846 days) to better understand the microbial diversity of produced water. We sequenced the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene to assess taxonomy and utilized quantitative PCR (qPCR) to evaluate the microbial abundance across all 42 produced water samples. Bacteria of the order Halanaerobiales were found to be the most abundant organisms in the majority of the produced water samples, emphasizing their previously suggested role in hydraulic fracturing-related microbial activity. Statistical analyses identified correlations between well age and biocide formulation and the microbial community, in particular, the relative abundance of Halanaerobiales. We further investigated the role of members of the order Halanaerobiales in produced water by reconstructing and annotating a Halanaerobium draft genome (named MDAL1), using shotgun metagenomic sequencing and metagenomic binning. The recovered draft genome was found to be closely related to the species H. congolense, an oil field isolate, and Halanaerobium sp. strain T82-1, also recovered from hydraulic fracturing produced water. Reconstruction of metabolic pathways revealed Halanaerobium sp. strain MDAL1 to have the potential for acid production, thiosulfate reduction, and biofilm formation, suggesting it to have the ability to contribute to corrosion, souring, and biofouling events in the hydraulic fracturing infrastructure.},
doi = {10.1128/AEM.02659-16},
journal = {Applied and Environmental Microbiology},
number = 8,
volume = 83,
place = {United States},
year = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Fri Feb 03 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1 work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

Save / Share: