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Title: The Applications of Modern Nanoindentation

Abstract

The TI-950 TriboIndenter is a nanoindentation device that obtains nanometer resolution material topography images using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), modulus maps of material using nano-Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, and provides hardness measurements with a resolution of 0.2 nm. The instrument applies a force to a material through a sharp tip and used a transducer to measure the force a material applies back to the tip to derive information about the material. The information can be used to study the homogeneity of material surfaces as well as the homogeneity of the material as a function of depth and can lead to important information on the aging of the material as well as the consistency of the production of the material.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Office of Defense Programs (DP) (NA-10)
OSTI Identifier:
1351173
Report Number(s):
LA-UR-17-22229
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; Material Science; Nanoindentation

Citation Formats

Van Buskirk, Caleb Griffith. The Applications of Modern Nanoindentation. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1351173.
Van Buskirk, Caleb Griffith. The Applications of Modern Nanoindentation. United States. doi:10.2172/1351173.
Van Buskirk, Caleb Griffith. Thu . "The Applications of Modern Nanoindentation". United States. doi:10.2172/1351173. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351173.
@article{osti_1351173,
title = {The Applications of Modern Nanoindentation},
author = {Van Buskirk, Caleb Griffith},
abstractNote = {The TI-950 TriboIndenter is a nanoindentation device that obtains nanometer resolution material topography images using Scanning Probe Microscopy (SPM), modulus maps of material using nano-Dynamic Mechanical Analysis, and provides hardness measurements with a resolution of 0.2 nm. The instrument applies a force to a material through a sharp tip and used a transducer to measure the force a material applies back to the tip to derive information about the material. The information can be used to study the homogeneity of material surfaces as well as the homogeneity of the material as a function of depth and can lead to important information on the aging of the material as well as the consistency of the production of the material.},
doi = {10.2172/1351173},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 16 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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