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Title: Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study

Abstract

Here, wsing the validated simulation model developed in part one of this study for biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP), we assess the functional utility of using this validated model to assist in the development of CFP processes in fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactors to a commercially viable state. Specifically, we examine the effects of mass flow rates, boundary conditions (BCs), pyrolysis vapor molecular weight variation, and the impact of the chemical cracking kinetics on the catalyst residence times. The factors that had the largest impact on the catalyst residence time included the feed stock molecular weight and the degree of chemical cracking as controlled by the catalyst activity. Lastly, because FCC reactors have primarily been developed and utilized for petroleum cracking, we perform a comparison analysis of CFP with petroleum and show the operating regimes are fundamentally different.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [2]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1]
  1. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). National Bioenergy Center
  2. SABIC Americas, Sugar Land, TX (United States). Corporate Research and Development
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Bioenergy Technologies Office (EE-3B)
OSTI Identifier:
1351151
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5100-67671
Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 5; Journal Issue: 4; Journal ID: ISSN 2168-0485
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; catalytic fast pyrolysis; catalytic upgrading; riser reactor; multiphase flow simulation; catalyst residence time distribution

Citation Formats

Foust, Thomas D., Ziegler, Jack L., Pannala, Sreekanth, Ciesielski, Peter, Nimlos, Mark R., and Robichaud, David J. Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02385.
Foust, Thomas D., Ziegler, Jack L., Pannala, Sreekanth, Ciesielski, Peter, Nimlos, Mark R., & Robichaud, David J. Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study. United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02385.
Foust, Thomas D., Ziegler, Jack L., Pannala, Sreekanth, Ciesielski, Peter, Nimlos, Mark R., and Robichaud, David J. Tue . "Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study". United States. doi:10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02385. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1351151.
@article{osti_1351151,
title = {Catalyst Residence Time Distributions in Riser Reactors for Catalytic Fast Pyrolysis. Part 2: Pilot-Scale Simulations and Operational Parameter Study},
author = {Foust, Thomas D. and Ziegler, Jack L. and Pannala, Sreekanth and Ciesielski, Peter and Nimlos, Mark R. and Robichaud, David J.},
abstractNote = {Here, wsing the validated simulation model developed in part one of this study for biomass catalytic fast pyrolysis (CFP), we assess the functional utility of using this validated model to assist in the development of CFP processes in fluidized catalytic cracking (FCC) reactors to a commercially viable state. Specifically, we examine the effects of mass flow rates, boundary conditions (BCs), pyrolysis vapor molecular weight variation, and the impact of the chemical cracking kinetics on the catalyst residence times. The factors that had the largest impact on the catalyst residence time included the feed stock molecular weight and the degree of chemical cracking as controlled by the catalyst activity. Lastly, because FCC reactors have primarily been developed and utilized for petroleum cracking, we perform a comparison analysis of CFP with petroleum and show the operating regimes are fundamentally different.},
doi = {10.1021/acssuschemeng.6b02385},
journal = {ACS Sustainable Chemistry & Engineering},
number = 4,
volume = 5,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Tue Feb 21 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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