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Title: The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface

Abstract

The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [1];  [4]
  1. Kitware, Inc., Clifton Park, NY (United States)
  2. Intelligent Light, Rutherford, NJ (United States)
  3. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  4. Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1350978
Report Number(s):
LBNL-1007263
ir:1007263
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-05CH11231
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Second Workshop on In Situ Infrastructures for Enabling Extreme-Scale Analysis and Visualization, Salt Lake City, UT (United States), 13 Nov 2016
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Ayachit, Utkarsh, Whitlock, Brad, Wolf, Matthew, Loring, Burlen, Geveci, Berk, Lonie, David, and Bethel, E. Wes. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1109/ISAV.2016.013.
Ayachit, Utkarsh, Whitlock, Brad, Wolf, Matthew, Loring, Burlen, Geveci, Berk, Lonie, David, & Bethel, E. Wes. The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface. United States. doi:10.1109/ISAV.2016.013.
Ayachit, Utkarsh, Whitlock, Brad, Wolf, Matthew, Loring, Burlen, Geveci, Berk, Lonie, David, and Bethel, E. Wes. Tue . "The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface". United States. doi:10.1109/ISAV.2016.013. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1350978.
@article{osti_1350978,
title = {The SENSEI Generic In Situ Interface},
author = {Ayachit, Utkarsh and Whitlock, Brad and Wolf, Matthew and Loring, Burlen and Geveci, Berk and Lonie, David and Bethel, E. Wes},
abstractNote = {The SENSEI generic in situ interface is an API that promotes code portability and reusability. From the simulation view, a developer can instrument their code with the SENSEI API and then make make use of any number of in situ infrastructures. From the method view, a developer can write an in situ method using the SENSEI API, then expect it to run in any number of in situ infrastructures, or be invoked directly from a simulation code, with little or no modification. This paper presents the design principles underlying the SENSEI generic interface, along with some simplified coding examples.},
doi = {10.1109/ISAV.2016.013},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 11 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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