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Title: After Paris, the Smart Bet is on a Clean Energy Future

Abstract

In this article for GreenMoney Journal, Doug Arent, Executive Director of the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis, reviews recent energy systems investment patterns and discusses what they mean for the future of energy in the United States and around the world.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1350914
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-6A50-66387
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: GreenMoney
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; investment; energy; system; finance

Citation Formats

Arent, Doug. After Paris, the Smart Bet is on a Clean Energy Future. United States: N. p., 2016. Web.
Arent, Doug. After Paris, the Smart Bet is on a Clean Energy Future. United States.
Arent, Doug. 2016. "After Paris, the Smart Bet is on a Clean Energy Future". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_1350914,
title = {After Paris, the Smart Bet is on a Clean Energy Future},
author = {Arent, Doug},
abstractNote = {In this article for GreenMoney Journal, Doug Arent, Executive Director of the Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis, reviews recent energy systems investment patterns and discusses what they mean for the future of energy in the United States and around the world.},
doi = {},
journal = {GreenMoney},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 7
}
  • The current power consumption in different parts of the world and an estimate of the world`s future energy needs are given. The present energy supplies and prospects, the possible consequences of a continued massive fossil fuel consumption, and the potential of non-fossil candidates for long-term energy production are outlined. An introduction to possible fusion processes in future fusion reactors is given. The inexhaustibility, safety, environmental and economic aspects of magnetic fusion energy are discussed. 23 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.
  • The current power consumption in different parts of the world and an estimate of the future energy needs of the world are given. The present energy supplies and prospects, the possible consequences of a continued massive fossil fuel consumption, and the potential of non-fossil candidates for long-term energy production are outlined. An introduction to possible fusion processes in future fusion reactors is given. The inexhaustibility, safety, environmental and economic aspects of magnetic fusion energy are discussed.
  • The current power consumption in different parts of the world and an estimate of the future energy needs of the world are given. The present energy supplies and prospects, the possible consequences of a continued massive fossil fuel consumption, and the potential of non-fossil candidates for long-term energy production are outlined. An introduction to possible fusion processes in future fusion reactors is given. The inexhaustibility, safety, environmental and economic aspects of magnetic fusion energy are discussed.
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