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Title: Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
OSTI Identifier:
1350777
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Published Article
Journal Name:
Ecosystems
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 1; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2018-02-13 04:33:29; Journal ID: ISSN 1432-9840
Publisher:
Springer Science + Business Media
Country of Publication:
Country unknown/Code not available
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Xia, Mengxue, Talhelm, Alan F., and Pregitzer, Kurt S.. Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition. Country unknown/Code not available: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0130-3.
Xia, Mengxue, Talhelm, Alan F., & Pregitzer, Kurt S.. Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition. Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0130-3.
Xia, Mengxue, Talhelm, Alan F., and Pregitzer, Kurt S.. Mon . "Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition". Country unknown/Code not available. doi:10.1007/s10021-017-0130-3.
@article{osti_1350777,
title = {Long-Term Simulated Atmospheric Nitrogen Deposition Alters Leaf and Fine Root Decomposition},
author = {Xia, Mengxue and Talhelm, Alan F. and Pregitzer, Kurt S.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1007/s10021-017-0130-3},
journal = {Ecosystems},
number = 1,
volume = 21,
place = {Country unknown/Code not available},
year = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 10 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1007/s10021-017-0130-3

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