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Title: Demand Response Resource Quantification with Detailed Building Energy Models

Abstract

Demand response is a broad suite of technologies that enables changes in electrical load operations in support of power system reliability and efficiency. Although demand response is not a new concept, there is new appetite for comprehensively evaluating its technical potential in the context of renewable energy integration. The complexity of demand response makes this task difficult -- we present new methods for capturing the heterogeneity of potential responses from buildings, their time-varying nature, and metrics such as thermal comfort that help quantify likely acceptability of specific demand response actions. Computed with an automated software framework, the methods are scalable.

Authors:
; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD)
OSTI Identifier:
1350500
Report Number(s):
NREL/PR-6A20-67531
DOE Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: Presented at the Institute for Operations Research and the Management Sciences (INFORMS) Annual Meeting, 13-16 November 2016, Nashville, Tennessee
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
24 POWER TRANSMISSION AND DISTRIBUTION; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY, AND ECONOMY; demand response; building energy simulation; power systems; production cost modeling; electrical load; technical potential

Citation Formats

Hale, Elaine, Horsey, Henry, Merket, Noel, Stoll, Brady, and Nag, Ambarish. Demand Response Resource Quantification with Detailed Building Energy Models. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Hale, Elaine, Horsey, Henry, Merket, Noel, Stoll, Brady, & Nag, Ambarish. Demand Response Resource Quantification with Detailed Building Energy Models. United States.
Hale, Elaine, Horsey, Henry, Merket, Noel, Stoll, Brady, and Nag, Ambarish. Mon . "Demand Response Resource Quantification with Detailed Building Energy Models". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1350500.
@article{osti_1350500,
title = {Demand Response Resource Quantification with Detailed Building Energy Models},
author = {Hale, Elaine and Horsey, Henry and Merket, Noel and Stoll, Brady and Nag, Ambarish},
abstractNote = {Demand response is a broad suite of technologies that enables changes in electrical load operations in support of power system reliability and efficiency. Although demand response is not a new concept, there is new appetite for comprehensively evaluating its technical potential in the context of renewable energy integration. The complexity of demand response makes this task difficult -- we present new methods for capturing the heterogeneity of potential responses from buildings, their time-varying nature, and metrics such as thermal comfort that help quantify likely acceptability of specific demand response actions. Computed with an automated software framework, the methods are scalable.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Apr 03 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Conference:
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