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Title: Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity

Abstract

Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.

Authors:
ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, University of Texas Medical Branch, 301 University Boulevard Rm. 5.114B, Galveston, TX 77555, USA
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349939
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Neural Plasticity; Journal Volume: 2017; Journal Issue: 2017
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Rudenko, Gabby. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1155/2017/6526151.
Rudenko, Gabby. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity. United States. doi:10.1155/2017/6526151.
Rudenko, Gabby. 2017. "Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity". United States. doi:10.1155/2017/6526151.
@article{osti_1349939,
title = {Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity},
author = {Rudenko, Gabby},
abstractNote = {Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.},
doi = {10.1155/2017/6526151},
journal = {Neural Plasticity},
number = 2017,
volume = 2017,
place = {United States},
year = 2017,
month = 1
}
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  • Abstract not provided.