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Title: Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment

Authors:
; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
NIHNIGMS
OSTI Identifier:
1349936
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America; Journal Volume: 114; Journal Issue: 14
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Cook, Jonathan D., Sultana, Azmiri, and Lee, Jeffrey E.. Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1073/pnas.1617993114.
Cook, Jonathan D., Sultana, Azmiri, & Lee, Jeffrey E.. Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment. United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1617993114.
Cook, Jonathan D., Sultana, Azmiri, and Lee, Jeffrey E.. Mon . "Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment". United States. doi:10.1073/pnas.1617993114.
@article{osti_1349936,
title = {Structure of the infectious salmon anemia virus receptor complex illustrates a unique binding strategy for attachment},
author = {Cook, Jonathan D. and Sultana, Azmiri and Lee, Jeffrey E.},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1073/pnas.1617993114},
journal = {Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America},
number = 14,
volume = 114,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • The effect of ultraviolet radiation on the infectivity of equine infectious anemia (EIA) virus is described using influenza virus and Rous sarcoma (RSV) virus as controls. Virus preparations were placed in Petri dishes and uv- irradiated by a 15 watt germicidal lamp. At intervals up to 30 min samples were taken to determine the infectivity in surviving fractions. The infectivity of the influenza virus was reduced by four orders about 2 min after irradiation; the EIA virus infectivity was reduced to the same extent in 20 min, and the RSV infectivity was reduced to the same extent in 30 min.
  • A new antiestrogen affinity ligand for the covalent labeling of estrogen receptors, (3H)desmethylnafoxidine aziridine, has been used to investigate the salt- and temperature-independent formation of DNA-binding estrogen receptor forms from untransformed (300 kilodaltons) receptor. Calf uterine estrogen receptor proteins labeled with (3H)estradiol or (3H)desmethylnafoxidine aziridine were quantitatively transformed (greater than 90%) to their DNA-binding configuration in low ionic strength buffers by brief exposure to 3 M urea at 0 C. The urea effect was hormone-dependent and partially reversible. The transformed receptors were purified (ca 250-fold) by affinity chromatography on single-stranded DNA-agarose in the continued presence of 3 M urea tomore » prevent transformation reversal. Scatchard analyses revealed a single class of high affinity radioligand binding sites (Kd = 0.34 nM) unchanged by urea-induced transformation and purification. The DNA-binding receptor form labeled with (3H)desmethylnafoxidine aziridine was stable as a probable dimer in 3 M urea with 0.4 M KCl and displayed no evidence of size (Stokes radius 7.3 to 7.5 nm; 4.2 to 4.3 S; Mr = 136,800) heterogeneity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis indicated the presence of an intact 67 kDa steroid-binding receptor subunit. Reverse-phase chromatography of the covalently labeled receptor on C4 and phenyl stationary phases revealed no evidence of structural heterogeneity. The surface charge of the estrogen- and antiestrogen-receptor complexes, however, was distinctly different in both the presence and absence of 3 M urea. Thus, exposure to urea was an effective salt- and temperature-independent means for achieving the complete transformation of receptor to its stable DNA-binding dimer configuration.« less
  • Infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), an aquatic birnavirus that infects salmonid fish, encodes a large polyprotein (NH{sub 2}-pVP2-VP4-VP3-COOH) that is processed through the proteolytic activity of its own protease, VP4, to release the proteins pVP2 and VP3. pVP2 is further processed to give rise to the capsid protein VP2 and three peptides that are incorporated into the virion. Reported here are two crystal structures of the IPNV VP4 protease solved from two different crystal symmetries. The electron density at the active site in the triclinic crystal form, refined to 2.2-{angstrom} resolution, reveals the acyl-enzyme complex formed with an internal VP4more » cleavage site. The complex was generated using a truncated enzyme in which the general base lysine was substituted. Inside the complex, the nucleophilic Ser{sup 633}O{gamma} forms an ester bond with the main-chain carbonyl of the C-terminal residue, Ala{sup 716}, of a neighboring VP4. The structure of this substrate-VP4 complex allows us to identify the S1, S3, S5, and S6 substrate binding pockets as well as other substrate-VP4 interactions and therefore provides structural insights into the substrate specificity of this enzyme. The structure from the hexagonal crystal form, refined to 2.3-{angstrom} resolution, reveals the free-binding site of the protease. Three-dimensional alignment with the VP4 of blotched snakehead virus, another birnavirus, shows that the overall structure of VP4 is conserved despite a low level of sequence identity ({approx}19%). The structure determinations of IPNV VP4, the first of an acyl-enzyme complex for a Ser/Lys dyad protease, provide insights into the catalytic mechanism and substrate recognition of this type of protease.« less
  • To determine if equine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) were susceptible to equine infectious anemia virus (EIAV) infection, ex vivo-generated DC were infected with virus in vitro. EIAV antigen was detected by immunofluorescence 3 days post-infection with maximum antigen being detected on day 4, whereas there was no antigen detected in DC incubated with the same amount of heat-inactivated EIAV. No cytolytic activity was observed after EIAV{sub WSU5} infection of DC. These monocyte-derived DC were more effective than macrophages and B cells in stimulating allogenic T lymphocytes. Both infected macrophages and DC stimulated similar levels of memory CTL responses in mixturesmore » of CD8+ and CD4+ cells as detected with {sup 51}Cr-release assays indicating that EIAV infection of DC did not alter antigen presentation. However, EIAV-infected DC were more effective than infected macrophages when used to stimulate memory CTL in isolated CD8+ cells. The maintenance of antigen processing and presenting function by EIAV-infected DC in vitro suggests that this function is maintained during in vivo infection.« less