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Title: Segregation of Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles to Bicontinuous Oil/Water Microemulsion Phases

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ; ORCiD logo; ; ORCiD logo
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Advanced Photon Source (APS)
Sponsoring Org.:
OTHER
OSTI Identifier:
1349931
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy and Fuels; Journal Volume: 31; Journal Issue: 2
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
ENGLISH

Citation Formats

Qi, Luqing, ShamsiJazeyi, Hadi, Ruan, Gedeng, Mann, Jason A., Lin, Yen-Hao, Song, Chen, Ma, Yichuan, Wang, Le, Tour, James M., Hirasaki, George J., and Verduzco, Rafael. Segregation of Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles to Bicontinuous Oil/Water Microemulsion Phases. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b02687.
Qi, Luqing, ShamsiJazeyi, Hadi, Ruan, Gedeng, Mann, Jason A., Lin, Yen-Hao, Song, Chen, Ma, Yichuan, Wang, Le, Tour, James M., Hirasaki, George J., & Verduzco, Rafael. Segregation of Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles to Bicontinuous Oil/Water Microemulsion Phases. United States. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b02687.
Qi, Luqing, ShamsiJazeyi, Hadi, Ruan, Gedeng, Mann, Jason A., Lin, Yen-Hao, Song, Chen, Ma, Yichuan, Wang, Le, Tour, James M., Hirasaki, George J., and Verduzco, Rafael. Wed . "Segregation of Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles to Bicontinuous Oil/Water Microemulsion Phases". United States. doi:10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b02687.
@article{osti_1349931,
title = {Segregation of Amphiphilic Polymer-Coated Nanoparticles to Bicontinuous Oil/Water Microemulsion Phases},
author = {Qi, Luqing and ShamsiJazeyi, Hadi and Ruan, Gedeng and Mann, Jason A. and Lin, Yen-Hao and Song, Chen and Ma, Yichuan and Wang, Le and Tour, James M. and Hirasaki, George J. and Verduzco, Rafael},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acs.energyfuels.6b02687},
journal = {Energy and Fuels},
number = 2,
volume = 31,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Wed Feb 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}
  • No abstract prepared.
  • We analyze the long-time self-diffusion properties of a density field theory for oil, water, and surfactant microemulsions. Specifically, we study the reduction of oil and water self-diffusion coefficients due to the complicated geometrical arrangement of oil-rich and water-rich phases in a bicontinuous microemulsion. This reduction, the tortuosity factor, is calculated by a massively-parallel, quenched Monte Carlo calculation. The direct calculation shows diffusive behavior persists to roughly 0.01 s in this system. Analytical arguments suggest that such behavior persists at longer times within the idealized quenched ensemble. The quenched ensemble becomes inappropriate at long times, due to surfactant membrane fluctuations andmore » dynamic oil-water equilibration, and these physical effects imply that diffusive behavior continues for times longer than those directly simulated. 20 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.« less
  • The solution structures in the three-component system sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl) phosphate (NaDEHP)/n-heptane/water have been investigated by dynamic and static light-scattering, electrical conductivity, and {sup 31}P-NMR spectroscopic and viscometric measurements. A transition in the physicochemical properties was observed over a rather narrow range of W{sub o} (molar ratio of water to NaDEHP) values. Rodlike reversed micelles and swollen rodlike reversed micelles form when W{sub o}< 4. Beyond this W{sub o} range, phase separation occurs at low NaDEHP concentrations, and homogeneous one-phase microemulsions form at high NaDEHP concentrations. It is suggested that the n-heptane-continuous solution of water-swollen reversed micelles transforms to a bicontinuousmore » microemulsion when W{sub o} increases beyond W{sub o} {approx} 4. The bicontinuous microemulsion region ranges between two local viscosity maxima at W{sub o}{approx} 4 and W{sub o}{approx} 100, and an oil-in-water (O/W) microemulsion exists when W{sub o}> 100. Local dynamic domain structures consistent with the bicontinuous microemulsion behaviors are proposed and discussed. 29 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.« less
  • Bicontinuous microemulsions (BμEs), consisting of water and oil nanodomains separated by surfactant monolayers of near-zero curvature, are potentially valuable systems for purification and delivery of biomolecules, for hosting multiphasic biochemical reactions, and as templating media for preparing nanomaterials. We formed Winsor-III systems by mixing aqueous protein and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) solutions with dodecane and 1-pentanol (cosurfactant) to efficiently extract proteins into the middle (BμE) phase. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and cytochrome c partitioned to the BμE phase at 64% and 81% efficiency, respectively, producing highly concentrated protein solutions (32 and 44 g L –1, respectively), through release of watermore » and oil from the BμEs. Circular dichroism spectroscopic analysis demonstrated that BSA underwent minor secondary structural changes upon incorporation into BμEs, while the secondary structure of cytochrome c and pepsin underwent major changes. Small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) results show that proteins promoted an increase of the interfacial fluidity and surface area per volume for the BμE surfactant monolayers, and that each protein uniquely altered self-assembly in the Winsor-III systems. Cytochrome c partitioned via electrostatic attractions between SDS and the protein’s positively-charged groups, residing near the surfactant head groups of BμE monolayers, where it decreased surfactant packing efficiency. BSA partitioned through formation of SDS-BSA complexes via hydrophobic and electrostatic attractive interactions. As the BSA-SDS ratio increased, complexes’ partitioning favored BμEs over the oil excess phase due to the increased hydrophilicity of the complexes. In conclusion, this study demonstrates the potential utility of BμEs to purify proteins and prepare nanostructured fluids possessing high protein concentration.« less
  • A model describing the partitioning of surfactant molecules between excess and microemulsion phases which are in equilibrium is proposed. The important parameters characterizing the individual molecules comprising the mixture are the critical micelle concentrations in water and the partition coefficients between oil and water phases. The model considers the existence of a separate surfactant phase which is the palisade layer of a micelle and leads to predictions for both fractionation and phase concentrations of surfactant. Predictions based on this model have been compared to experimentally determined quantities and the agreement is good for all cases tested. The model leads tomore » a relatively simple mathematical formulation which can be used to study the effect of varying the overall system surfactant concentration and of changing the system water-to-oil ratio. 21 references.« less