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Title: Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses

Abstract

Glass formation has been central to fabrication technologies since the dawn of civilization. Glasses not only encompass window panes, the insulation in our homes, the optical fibers supplying our cable TV, and vessels for eating and drinking, but they also include a vast array of ‘‘plastic’’ polymeric materials. Glasses find applications in high technology (e.g., producing microelectronic materials, etc., amorphous semiconductors), and recent advances have created ‘‘plastic metallic glasses’’ that are promising for fabricating everyday structural materials. Many commercially relevant systems, such as microemulsions and colloidal suspensions, have complex molecular structures and thus solidify by glass formation. Despite the importance of understanding the fundamental nature of glass formation for the synthesis of new materials, a predictive molecular theory has been lacking. Much of our understanding of glass formation derives from the analysis of experimental data, a process that has uncovered a number of interesting universal behaviors, namely, relations between properties that are independent of molecular details. However, these empirically derived relations and their limitations remain to be understood on the basis of theories, and, more importantly, there is strong need for theories of the explicit variation with molecular system to enable the rational design and tailoring of new materials. Wemore » have recently developed the generalized entropy theory, the only analytic, theory that enables describing the dependence of the properties of glass-formation on monomer molecular structures. These properties include the two central quantities of glass formation, the glass transition temperature and the glass fragility parameter, material dependent properties that govern how a material may be processed (e.g., by extrusion, ink jet, molding, etc.) Our recent works, which are further described below, extend the studies of glass formation in polymer systems to test the theory by directly comparing between the predictions of our generalized entropy theory with experiment and with simulations and to expand the vistas of the theory to describe a wider range of important systems (e.g. glass formation in binary blends and systems with specific interactions) and phenomena that are describable by the generalized entropy theory. In addition, we have addressed longstanding fundamental problems associated with the validity of the Adam-Gibbs theory, one of the underpinnings of the general entropy theory. Theoretical advances to enable describing the properties of glass-formation over a wider class of important polymeric systems, included semi-flexible systems, the more general situation of specific interactions, and more. Our recent work removes the simplest approximation uses the simplest model in which the interaction is approximated by a single, monomer average. Thus, the theory has been extended to allow some variations of the energy parameters between the atoms within the monomers. The theory has also been extended to include all the contributions from chain semi-flexibility. Both projects are extremely difficult, but the payback is that the process of solving the problems developed strong theoretical skills in Dr. Xu, who has recently begun a postdoc position at ORNL. The theory has also been extended to describe glass formation in partially miscible blends, with good general agreement with experiment. Again, the development of the theory presented an extremely difficult problem, but the payback is the development of a theory for a very important class of systems. Another project provides an extremely simple approximation for certain properties of glass formation in polymer melts and should make the theory more accessible to everyone.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [2]
  1. Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
  2. National Inst. of Standards and Technology (NIST), Boulder, CO (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1349873
Report Number(s):
DOE-UCHICAGO-0008631
DOE Contract Number:  
SC0008631
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; glass formation; free volume; entropic barriers; enthalpic barriers; thermodynamic scaling; polymer blends; miscibility; concentration fluctuations; glassy dynamics; phase transitions; electrostatic polarization; aggregation; multiple scattering theory; surface charges; specific interactions; polymer melts; cohesive energy; chain stiffness; glass transition temperature; fragility parameter; Adam-Gibbs theory; generalized entropy theory; transition state theory; grand canonical ensemble; structural relaxation; structural relaxation time; mechanical response; dynamic moduli; time-temperature superposition; dielectric response; monomer molecular structure; polymer packing; comparison with experiments for granular materials; image method for spheres; thermodynamical properties; glasses; molecular dynamics simulations; image method; electrostatics; induced charge; Poisson’s equation

Citation Formats

Freed, Karl F., Xu, Wen-Sheng, Dudowicz, Jacek B., and Douglas, Jack F. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1349873.
Freed, Karl F., Xu, Wen-Sheng, Dudowicz, Jacek B., & Douglas, Jack F. Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses. United States. doi:10.2172/1349873.
Freed, Karl F., Xu, Wen-Sheng, Dudowicz, Jacek B., and Douglas, Jack F. Wed . "Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses". United States. doi:10.2172/1349873. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349873.
@article{osti_1349873,
title = {Toward Molecular Engineering of Polymer Glasses},
author = {Freed, Karl F. and Xu, Wen-Sheng and Dudowicz, Jacek B. and Douglas, Jack F.},
abstractNote = {Glass formation has been central to fabrication technologies since the dawn of civilization. Glasses not only encompass window panes, the insulation in our homes, the optical fibers supplying our cable TV, and vessels for eating and drinking, but they also include a vast array of ‘‘plastic’’ polymeric materials. Glasses find applications in high technology (e.g., producing microelectronic materials, etc., amorphous semiconductors), and recent advances have created ‘‘plastic metallic glasses’’ that are promising for fabricating everyday structural materials. Many commercially relevant systems, such as microemulsions and colloidal suspensions, have complex molecular structures and thus solidify by glass formation. Despite the importance of understanding the fundamental nature of glass formation for the synthesis of new materials, a predictive molecular theory has been lacking. Much of our understanding of glass formation derives from the analysis of experimental data, a process that has uncovered a number of interesting universal behaviors, namely, relations between properties that are independent of molecular details. However, these empirically derived relations and their limitations remain to be understood on the basis of theories, and, more importantly, there is strong need for theories of the explicit variation with molecular system to enable the rational design and tailoring of new materials. We have recently developed the generalized entropy theory, the only analytic, theory that enables describing the dependence of the properties of glass-formation on monomer molecular structures. These properties include the two central quantities of glass formation, the glass transition temperature and the glass fragility parameter, material dependent properties that govern how a material may be processed (e.g., by extrusion, ink jet, molding, etc.) Our recent works, which are further described below, extend the studies of glass formation in polymer systems to test the theory by directly comparing between the predictions of our generalized entropy theory with experiment and with simulations and to expand the vistas of the theory to describe a wider range of important systems (e.g. glass formation in binary blends and systems with specific interactions) and phenomena that are describable by the generalized entropy theory. In addition, we have addressed longstanding fundamental problems associated with the validity of the Adam-Gibbs theory, one of the underpinnings of the general entropy theory. Theoretical advances to enable describing the properties of glass-formation over a wider class of important polymeric systems, included semi-flexible systems, the more general situation of specific interactions, and more. Our recent work removes the simplest approximation uses the simplest model in which the interaction is approximated by a single, monomer average. Thus, the theory has been extended to allow some variations of the energy parameters between the atoms within the monomers. The theory has also been extended to include all the contributions from chain semi-flexibility. Both projects are extremely difficult, but the payback is that the process of solving the problems developed strong theoretical skills in Dr. Xu, who has recently begun a postdoc position at ORNL. The theory has also been extended to describe glass formation in partially miscible blends, with good general agreement with experiment. Again, the development of the theory presented an extremely difficult problem, but the payback is the development of a theory for a very important class of systems. Another project provides an extremely simple approximation for certain properties of glass formation in polymer melts and should make the theory more accessible to everyone.},
doi = {10.2172/1349873},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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