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Title: The Weak Nuclear Force: Quantum Chameleon

Abstract

Radioactive decay is the transmutation of one subatomic particle into another. In most instances, what happens is that existing particles move to new configurations. However in radioactive decays using the weak force, a particular kind of particle disappears and is replaced by a completely different particle. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about how it all works and even describes a type of decay that has never been observed and, if it were observed, it would require the textbooks be rewritten.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
FNAL (Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349871
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; QUANTUM FORCES; STRONG NUCLEAR FORCE; WEAK NUCLEAR FORCE; ELECTROMAGNETISM; BOSON; PARTICLES; PHOTON; TOP QUARK; FLAVOR CHANGING NEUTRAL CURRENT

Citation Formats

Lincoln, Don. The Weak Nuclear Force: Quantum Chameleon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lincoln, Don. The Weak Nuclear Force: Quantum Chameleon. United States.
Lincoln, Don. Thu . "The Weak Nuclear Force: Quantum Chameleon". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349871.
@article{osti_1349871,
title = {The Weak Nuclear Force: Quantum Chameleon},
author = {Lincoln, Don},
abstractNote = {Radioactive decay is the transmutation of one subatomic particle into another. In most instances, what happens is that existing particles move to new configurations. However in radioactive decays using the weak force, a particular kind of particle disappears and is replaced by a completely different particle. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln talks about how it all works and even describes a type of decay that has never been observed and, if it were observed, it would require the textbooks be rewritten.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Mar 23 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Of all of the known subatomic forces, the weak force is in many ways unique. One particularly interesting facet is that the force differentiates between a particle that is rotating clockwise and counterclockwise. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln describes this unusual property and introduces some of the historical figures who played a role in working it all out.
  • The subatomic world is governed by three known forces, each with vastly different energy. In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln takes on the weak nuclear force and shows why it is so much weaker than the other known forces.
  • Scientists are aware of four fundamental forces- gravity, electromagnetism, and the strong and weak nuclear forces. Most people have at least some familiarity with gravity and electromagnetism, but not the other two. How is it that scientists are so certain that two additional forces exist? In this video, Fermilab’s Dr. Don Lincoln explains why scientists are so certain that the strong force exists.
  • The light rays from distant galaxies are deflected by massive structures along the line of sight, causing the galaxy images to be distorted.Measurements of these distortions, known as weak lensing, provide a way of measuring the distribution of dark matter as well as the spatial geometry of the universe. I will describe the ideas underlying this approach to cosmology. With planned large imaging surveys, weak lensing is a powerful probe of dark energy. I will discuss the observational challenges ahead and recent progress in developing multiple, complementary approaches to lensing measurements.