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Title: E-RECOV, Electrochemical Recycling Electronic Constituents of Value

Abstract

Methods for handling electronic waste have failed to keep pace with the world’s growing use of electronics. Recycling is not only an opportunity to reclaim valuable metals for new products, it’s also a responsible way to keep outdated electronics from ending up in unwanted places. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Critical Materials Institute has helped researchers at Idaho National Laboratory develop an economically and sound solution to discarding electronics.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349854
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
12 MANAGEMENT OF RADIOACTIVE AND NON-RADIOACTIVE WASTES FROM NUCLEAR FACILITIES; E-RECOV; RECYCLABLE MATERIALS; ELECTRONICS; ELECTRONIC DEVICES; ELECTRONIC WASTE

Citation Formats

Lister, Tedd. E-RECOV, Electrochemical Recycling Electronic Constituents of Value. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Lister, Tedd. E-RECOV, Electrochemical Recycling Electronic Constituents of Value. United States.
Lister, Tedd. Wed . "E-RECOV, Electrochemical Recycling Electronic Constituents of Value". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349854.
@article{osti_1349854,
title = {E-RECOV, Electrochemical Recycling Electronic Constituents of Value},
author = {Lister, Tedd},
abstractNote = {Methods for handling electronic waste have failed to keep pace with the world’s growing use of electronics. Recycling is not only an opportunity to reclaim valuable metals for new products, it’s also a responsible way to keep outdated electronics from ending up in unwanted places. The U.S. Department of Energy’s Critical Materials Institute has helped researchers at Idaho National Laboratory develop an economically and sound solution to discarding electronics.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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