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Title: Branson: A Mini-App for Studying Parallel IMC, Version 1.0

Abstract

This code solves the gray thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations in parallel using simple opacities and Cartesian meshes. Although Branson solves the TRT equations it is not designed to model radiation transport: Branson contains simple physics and does not have a multigroup treatment, nor can it use physical material data. The opacities have are simple polynomials in temperature there is a limited ability to specify complex geometries and sources. Branson was designed only to capture the computational demands of production IMC codes, especially in large parallel runs. It was also intended to foster collaboration with vendors, universities and other DOE partners. Branson is similar in character to the neutron transport proxy-app Quicksilver from LLNL, which was recently open-sourced.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. LANL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
Contributing Org.:
Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL)
OSTI Identifier:
1349853
Report Number(s):
Branson; 005211MLTPL00
C17048
DOE Contract Number:
AC52-06NA25396
Resource Type:
Software
Software Revision:
00
Software Package Number:
005211
Software CPU:
MLTPL
Open Source:
Yes
Open Source under the BSD License
Source Code Available:
Yes
Related Software:
SILO, HDF5
Country of Publication:
United States

Citation Formats

Long, Alex. Branson: A Mini-App for Studying Parallel IMC, Version 1.0. Computer software. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1349853. Vers. 00. USDOE. 28 Mar. 2017. Web.
Long, Alex. (2017, March 28). Branson: A Mini-App for Studying Parallel IMC, Version 1.0 (Version 00) [Computer software]. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1349853.
Long, Alex. Branson: A Mini-App for Studying Parallel IMC, Version 1.0. Computer software. Version 00. March 28, 2017. https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1349853.
@misc{osti_1349853,
title = {Branson: A Mini-App for Studying Parallel IMC, Version 1.0, Version 00},
author = {Long, Alex},
abstractNote = {This code solves the gray thermal radiative transfer (TRT) equations in parallel using simple opacities and Cartesian meshes. Although Branson solves the TRT equations it is not designed to model radiation transport: Branson contains simple physics and does not have a multigroup treatment, nor can it use physical material data. The opacities have are simple polynomials in temperature there is a limited ability to specify complex geometries and sources. Branson was designed only to capture the computational demands of production IMC codes, especially in large parallel runs. It was also intended to foster collaboration with vendors, universities and other DOE partners. Branson is similar in character to the neutron transport proxy-app Quicksilver from LLNL, which was recently open-sourced.},
url = {https://www.osti.gov//servlets/purl/1349853},
doi = {},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
note =
}

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