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Title: GLASS: General Line Ampacity State Solver

Abstract

The U.S. installed more than 8,000 megawatts of wind generation in 2016. Wind energy is now powering more than 20 million homes. Idaho National Laboratory technology uses real time weather information and computer models to help utilities integrate more wind energy, relieving transmission line congestion, and extending the life time of existing grid infrastructure.

Authors:
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
INL (Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Falls, ID (United States))
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Wind and Water Technologies Office (EE-4W)
OSTI Identifier:
1349851
Resource Type:
Multimedia
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
17 WIND ENERGY; WIND GENERATION; TRANSMISSION LINES; ELECTRICITY; UTILITIES; GLASS; WINDSIM; WEATHER STATIONS

Citation Formats

Gentle, Jake. GLASS: General Line Ampacity State Solver. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Gentle, Jake. GLASS: General Line Ampacity State Solver. United States.
Gentle, Jake. Wed . "GLASS: General Line Ampacity State Solver". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349851.
@article{osti_1349851,
title = {GLASS: General Line Ampacity State Solver},
author = {Gentle, Jake},
abstractNote = {The U.S. installed more than 8,000 megawatts of wind generation in 2016. Wind energy is now powering more than 20 million homes. Idaho National Laboratory technology uses real time weather information and computer models to help utilities integrate more wind energy, relieving transmission line congestion, and extending the life time of existing grid infrastructure.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Apr 05 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
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