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Title: From parabolic-trough to metasurface-concentrator: assessing focusing in the wave-optics limit

Authors:
; ; ;
Publication Date:
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349711
Grant/Contract Number:
EE0007341
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Publisher's Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Optics Letters
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 42; Journal Issue: 8; Related Information: CHORUS Timestamp: 2017-06-25 10:09:30; Journal ID: ISSN 0146-9592
Publisher:
Optical Society of America
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Hsu, Liyi, Dupré, Matthieu, Ndao, Abdoulaye, and Kanté, Boubacar. From parabolic-trough to metasurface-concentrator: assessing focusing in the wave-optics limit. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1364/OL.42.001520.
Hsu, Liyi, Dupré, Matthieu, Ndao, Abdoulaye, & Kanté, Boubacar. From parabolic-trough to metasurface-concentrator: assessing focusing in the wave-optics limit. United States. doi:10.1364/OL.42.001520.
Hsu, Liyi, Dupré, Matthieu, Ndao, Abdoulaye, and Kanté, Boubacar. Thu . "From parabolic-trough to metasurface-concentrator: assessing focusing in the wave-optics limit". United States. doi:10.1364/OL.42.001520.
@article{osti_1349711,
title = {From parabolic-trough to metasurface-concentrator: assessing focusing in the wave-optics limit},
author = {Hsu, Liyi and Dupré, Matthieu and Ndao, Abdoulaye and Kanté, Boubacar},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1364/OL.42.001520},
journal = {Optics Letters},
number = 8,
volume = 42,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Thu Apr 06 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
Publisher's Version of Record at 10.1364/OL.42.001520

Citation Metrics:
Cited by: 1work
Citation information provided by
Web of Science

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