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Title: NexusHaus: Solar Decathlon House

Abstract

The University of Texas at Austin and The Technical University of Munich 2015 Solar Decathlon house is called Nexushaus because it combines UT Austin and TUM students in an affordable modular residential green building in the context of Austin, Texas, based on shape forming principles found in nature that demonstrates transformative technologies in Zero Net Energy, Zero Net Water and Carbon Neutrality. To meet the needs of the competition, a portable modular design has been developed with an assembly that enables ease of installation and both quantitative and qualitative performance in the design. The prefabricated house sits lightly on the land and forms the superstructure for photovoltaic technologies, rainwater collection, aquaculture and permaculture gardening and indoor/outdoor living. The ultimate goal of Nexushaus is to serve as a potential prototype for a next-generation modular home that could be reproduced in mass in an assembly plant in Austin.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. University of Texas at Austin
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
The University of Texas at Austin
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)
OSTI Identifier:
1349685
DOE Contract Number:
EE0006558
Resource Type:
Other
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
solar decathlon, zero net energy, zero net water, carbon neutral

Citation Formats

Garrison, Michael Lynn. NexusHaus: Solar Decathlon House. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Garrison, Michael Lynn. NexusHaus: Solar Decathlon House. United States.
Garrison, Michael Lynn. Tue . "NexusHaus: Solar Decathlon House". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349685.
@article{osti_1349685,
title = {NexusHaus: Solar Decathlon House},
author = {Garrison, Michael Lynn},
abstractNote = {The University of Texas at Austin and The Technical University of Munich 2015 Solar Decathlon house is called Nexushaus because it combines UT Austin and TUM students in an affordable modular residential green building in the context of Austin, Texas, based on shape forming principles found in nature that demonstrates transformative technologies in Zero Net Energy, Zero Net Water and Carbon Neutrality. To meet the needs of the competition, a portable modular design has been developed with an assembly that enables ease of installation and both quantitative and qualitative performance in the design. The prefabricated house sits lightly on the land and forms the superstructure for photovoltaic technologies, rainwater collection, aquaculture and permaculture gardening and indoor/outdoor living. The ultimate goal of Nexushaus is to serve as a potential prototype for a next-generation modular home that could be reproduced in mass in an assembly plant in Austin.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}
  • Coastal towns and cities across the Northeastern US, with their high population density, aged utility infrastructure, and unique geography, are increasingly vulnerable to climate change related storm events. In October 2012 superstorm Sandy highlighted the fragility of our current coastal building types and made clear the need for a new model of design and construction which works to understand and mitigate these weaknesses. Dramatic changes in public policy, championed by both The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) are driving the rebuilding of these shore communities, often resulting in costly renovations, un-sustainable neighborhood configurationsmore » and in direct conflict with concurrent government policies such as The American with Disabilities Act (ADA). The SURE HOUSE demonstrates a series of new design solutions to these conflicting public policies and environmental imperatives. At Stevens Institute of Technology, the 2015 Solar Decathlon started with the challenge: Can we design a home for coastal New Jersey that dramatically reduces its energy use while protecting itself from the realities of a changing, more extreme climate? The SURE HOUSE merges the iconic 20th century shore home with 21st century building science. Utilizing innovative renewable energy technologies, a ‘Passive House’ level building envelope, and rugged glass-fiber-composite materials to flood-proof the home, the SURE HOUSE is a high-performance, net-zero-energy home, armored against extreme weather, designed for the contemporary lifestyle of the Jersey Shore and other vulnerable coastal communities. SUSTAINABLE At Stevens, we recognize that energy use in the home and workplace is directly connected to the growing problem of climate change. 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Low consumption, low production. RESILIENT In October of 2012, Hurricane Sandy wreaked havoc along the east coast of the US. In New Jersey alone there was an estimated 29.4 billion dollars in damages, 346,000 homes affected, and almost two and a half million people left without power, in some cases for over 10 days. Recovery from this storm and associated flooding is ongoing to this day, as many New Jersey homeowners grapple with the large costs of rebuilding and struggle to adapt to complicated new home building regulations. Damage from this storm to Hoboken, the home of the Stevens Institute of Technology’s campus, and to the New Jersey shore was extensive and many students on the SURE HOUSE team were directly affected by this historic event. The Stevens design team recognizes that in a world of more frequent and stronger storms, the ability to absorb and adapt to change is more important than ever. 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