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Title: Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing

Abstract

A resonator for sensing a physical or an environmental parameter includes a support having a top surface that provides a ground plane, and a polymer-derived ceramic (PDC) element positioned on the top surface including a PDC layer, and a metal patch on the PDC layer. The metal patch is electrically isolated from all surrounding structure, and the resonator has a resonant frequency that changes as a function of the physical or environmental parameter. A system for wirelessly sensing a physical or environmental parameter includes at least one resonator and a wireless RF reader located remotely from the resonator for transmitting a wide-band RF interrogation signal that excites the resonator. The wireless RF reader detects a sensing signal retransmitted by the resonator and includes a processor for determining the physical or environmental parameter at the location of the resonator from the sensing signal.

Inventors:
;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Central Florida Research Foundation, Inc. Orlando, FL (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349680
Patent Number(s):
9,612,164
Application Number:
14/338,489
Assignee:
University of Central Florida Research Foundation, Inc. NETL
DOE Contract Number:
FE0001241
Resource Type:
Patent
Resource Relation:
Patent File Date: 2014 Jul 23
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
47 OTHER INSTRUMENTATION

Citation Formats

Gong, Xun, and An, Linan. Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Gong, Xun, & An, Linan. Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing. United States.
Gong, Xun, and An, Linan. Tue . "Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349680.
@article{osti_1349680,
title = {Low-profile wireless passive resonators for sensing},
author = {Gong, Xun and An, Linan},
abstractNote = {A resonator for sensing a physical or an environmental parameter includes a support having a top surface that provides a ground plane, and a polymer-derived ceramic (PDC) element positioned on the top surface including a PDC layer, and a metal patch on the PDC layer. The metal patch is electrically isolated from all surrounding structure, and the resonator has a resonant frequency that changes as a function of the physical or environmental parameter. A system for wirelessly sensing a physical or environmental parameter includes at least one resonator and a wireless RF reader located remotely from the resonator for transmitting a wide-band RF interrogation signal that excites the resonator. The wireless RF reader detects a sensing signal retransmitted by the resonator and includes a processor for determining the physical or environmental parameter at the location of the resonator from the sensing signal.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Apr 04 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Patent:

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