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Title: Grand challenges in understanding the interplay of climate and land changes

Abstract

Half of the Earth s land surface has been altered by human activities, creating various consequences on the climate and weather systems at local to global scales, which in turn affects a myriad of land surface processes and our adaptation behaviors. We here review the status and major knowledge gaps of studying the interactions of land and atmospheric changes and present eleven grand challenge areas for scientific research and adaptation communities in the coming decade: (1) collective and separate impacts of major land changes and the interactions with non-land-change factors such as atmospheric CO2 increase, (2) carbon and other biogeochemical cycles, (3) climatically relevant biospheric emissions such as aerosols, (4) water cycle, (5) agriculture, (6) urbanization, (7) gradual acclimation of plants, communities, and ecosystems to climate and environmental changes, (8) plant migration, (9) land use projections, (10) reduction of uncertainties in models and data, and finally (11) adaptation strategies. We conclude that we need to create and maintain a close cross-disciplinary coordination between measurements and process representation in models to analyze complex multi-facet interrelated perturbations and feedbacks between land and climate changes. Along with major scientific research thrusts, land-use and land cover change mitigation and adaptation assessments should be strengthenedmore » to identify barriers that need to be overcome, evaluate and prioritize opportunities, and examine how decision making processes work in specific contexts.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [5];  [6];  [7];  [8];  [9];  [10];  [1];  [11];  [1];  [12];  [13];  [13];  [14]
  1. U.S. Geological Survey, Sioux Falls, SD (United States)
  2. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), College Park, MD (United States)
  3. Max-Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany)
  4. McGill Univ., Montreal, QC (Canada)
  5. The Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  6. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, College Park, MD (United States)
  7. U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, Ames, IA (United States)
  8. South Dakota State Univ., Brookings, SD (United States)
  9. U.S. Geological Survey, Augusta, ME (United States)
  10. Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang (China)
  11. Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  12. Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)
  13. Beijing Normal Univ., Beijing (China)
  14. Peking Univ., Beijing (China)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC)
OSTI Identifier:
1349619
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Earth Interactions
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 1087-3562
Publisher:
American Meteorological Association
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; climate change; anthropogenic effects; atmosphere–land interaction; land use; planning

Citation Formats

Liu, Shuguang, Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Boysen, Lena R., Ford, James D., Fox, Andrew, Gallo, Kevin, Hatfield, Jerry, Henebry, Geoffrey M., Huntington, Thomas G., Liu, Zhihua, Loveland, Thomas R., Norby, Richard J., Sohl, Terry, Steiner, Allison L., Yuan, Wenping, Zhang, Zhao, and Zhao, Shuqing. Grand challenges in understanding the interplay of climate and land changes. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1175/EI-D-16-0012.1.
Liu, Shuguang, Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Boysen, Lena R., Ford, James D., Fox, Andrew, Gallo, Kevin, Hatfield, Jerry, Henebry, Geoffrey M., Huntington, Thomas G., Liu, Zhihua, Loveland, Thomas R., Norby, Richard J., Sohl, Terry, Steiner, Allison L., Yuan, Wenping, Zhang, Zhao, & Zhao, Shuqing. Grand challenges in understanding the interplay of climate and land changes. United States. doi:10.1175/EI-D-16-0012.1.
Liu, Shuguang, Bond-Lamberty, Ben, Boysen, Lena R., Ford, James D., Fox, Andrew, Gallo, Kevin, Hatfield, Jerry, Henebry, Geoffrey M., Huntington, Thomas G., Liu, Zhihua, Loveland, Thomas R., Norby, Richard J., Sohl, Terry, Steiner, Allison L., Yuan, Wenping, Zhang, Zhao, and Zhao, Shuqing. Tue . "Grand challenges in understanding the interplay of climate and land changes". United States. doi:10.1175/EI-D-16-0012.1. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349619.
@article{osti_1349619,
title = {Grand challenges in understanding the interplay of climate and land changes},
author = {Liu, Shuguang and Bond-Lamberty, Ben and Boysen, Lena R. and Ford, James D. and Fox, Andrew and Gallo, Kevin and Hatfield, Jerry and Henebry, Geoffrey M. and Huntington, Thomas G. and Liu, Zhihua and Loveland, Thomas R. and Norby, Richard J. and Sohl, Terry and Steiner, Allison L. and Yuan, Wenping and Zhang, Zhao and Zhao, Shuqing},
abstractNote = {Half of the Earth s land surface has been altered by human activities, creating various consequences on the climate and weather systems at local to global scales, which in turn affects a myriad of land surface processes and our adaptation behaviors. We here review the status and major knowledge gaps of studying the interactions of land and atmospheric changes and present eleven grand challenge areas for scientific research and adaptation communities in the coming decade: (1) collective and separate impacts of major land changes and the interactions with non-land-change factors such as atmospheric CO2 increase, (2) carbon and other biogeochemical cycles, (3) climatically relevant biospheric emissions such as aerosols, (4) water cycle, (5) agriculture, (6) urbanization, (7) gradual acclimation of plants, communities, and ecosystems to climate and environmental changes, (8) plant migration, (9) land use projections, (10) reduction of uncertainties in models and data, and finally (11) adaptation strategies. We conclude that we need to create and maintain a close cross-disciplinary coordination between measurements and process representation in models to analyze complex multi-facet interrelated perturbations and feedbacks between land and climate changes. Along with major scientific research thrusts, land-use and land cover change mitigation and adaptation assessments should be strengthened to identify barriers that need to be overcome, evaluate and prioritize opportunities, and examine how decision making processes work in specific contexts.},
doi = {10.1175/EI-D-16-0012.1},
journal = {Earth Interactions},
number = 2,
volume = 21,
place = {United States},
year = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Tue Mar 28 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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  • The President s Climate Change Action Plan calls for the development of better science, data, and tools for climate preparedness. Many of the current questions about preparedness for extreme weather events in coming decades are, however, difficult to answer with assets that have been developed by climate science to answer longer-term questions about climate change. Capacities for projecting exposures to climate-related extreme events, along with their implications for interconnected infrastructures, are now emerging.
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