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Title: DOE Award No. FG02-93ER14331 Final Technical Report

Abstract

We have studyed new aspects of the relationships between nanoscale surface features and heterogeneous catalysis or electrocatalysis. We concentrate on atomically rough and morphologically unstable surfaces of catalytic metal single crystals (Re, Ru, Ir) that undergo nanoscale faceting when interacting with strongly adsorbed species (e.g. O, N, C) at elevated temperatures.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
Contributing Org.:
University of Ulm; Princeton University
OSTI Identifier:
1349430
Report Number(s):
1
DOE Contract Number:
FG02-93ER14331
Resource Type:
Technical Report
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Bartynski, Robert. DOE Award No. FG02-93ER14331 Final Technical Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.2172/1349430.
Bartynski, Robert. DOE Award No. FG02-93ER14331 Final Technical Report. United States. doi:10.2172/1349430.
Bartynski, Robert. Sun . "DOE Award No. FG02-93ER14331 Final Technical Report". United States. doi:10.2172/1349430. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349430.
@article{osti_1349430,
title = {DOE Award No. FG02-93ER14331 Final Technical Report},
author = {Bartynski, Robert},
abstractNote = {We have studyed new aspects of the relationships between nanoscale surface features and heterogeneous catalysis or electrocatalysis. We concentrate on atomically rough and morphologically unstable surfaces of catalytic metal single crystals (Re, Ru, Ir) that undergo nanoscale faceting when interacting with strongly adsorbed species (e.g. O, N, C) at elevated temperatures.},
doi = {10.2172/1349430},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Sun Apr 02 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Technical Report:

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  • This project deals with the covalent anchoring of various derivatives of triazacyclononane (TACN)ligands in the channels of period mesoporous materials and the catalytic activity of the corresponding metal complexes. Catalyst preparation, ligand immobilization, catalyst characterization, and catalyst performance in selective oxidation are discussed. A wide range of pendant variations on the TACN ligand can be synthesized, and ligands can be covalently bound to high surface area, pseudo-crystalline, silicate solids, before or after pendant addition.
  • As the flood of data associated with leading edge computational science continues to escalate, the challenge of supporting the distributed collaborations that are now characteristic of it becomes increasingly daunting. The chief obstacles to progress on this front lie less in the synchronous elements of collaboration, which have been reasonably well addressed by new global high performance networks, than in the asynchronous elements, where appropriate shared storage infrastructure seems to be lacking. The recent report from the Department of Energy on the emerging 'data management challenge' captures the multidimensional nature of this problem succinctly: Data inevitably needs to be buffered,more » for periods ranging from seconds to weeks, in order to be controlled as it moves through the distributed and collaborative research process. To meet the diverse and changing set of application needs that different research communities have, large amounts of non-archival storage are required for transitory buffering, and it needs to be widely dispersed, easily available, and configured to maximize flexibility of use. In today's grid fabric, however, massive storage is mostly concentrated in data centers, available only to those with user accounts and membership in the appropriate virtual organizations, allocated as if its usage were non-transitory, and encapsulated behind legacy interfaces that inhibit the flexibility of use and scheduling. This situation severely restricts the ability of application communities to access and schedule usable storage where and when they need to in order to make their workflow more productive. (p.69f) One possible strategy to deal with this problem lies in creating a storage infrastructure that can be universally shared because it provides only the most generic of asynchronous services. Different user communities then define higher level services as necessary to meet their needs. One model of such a service is a Storage Network, analogous to those used within computation centers, but designed to operate on a global scale. Building on a basic storage service that is as primitive as possible, such a Global Storage Network would define a framework within which higher level services can be created. If this framework enabled a variety of more specialized middleware and supported a wide array of applications, then interoperability and collaboration could occur based on that common framework. The research in Logistical Networking (LN) carried out under the DOE's SciDAC program tested the value of this approach within the context of several SciDAC application communities. Below we briefly describe the basic design of the LN storage network and some of the results that the Logistical Networking community has achieved.« less
  • The goals of this work were: (1) to improve the University of Washington shallow cumulus parameterization, first developed by the PI's group for better simulation of shallow oceanic cumulus convection in the MM5 mesoscale model (Bretherton et al., 2004, Mon. Wea. Rev.); (2) to explore its applicability to deep (precipitating) cumulus convection; and (3) to explore fundamental physical issues related to this cumulus parameterization.
  • The shoot apical meristems of land plants are small mounds of hundreds of cells located at the tips of branches. It is from these small clusters of cells that essentially all above ground plant biomass and therefore much of our energy supply originates. Several key genes have been discovered that are necessary for cells in the shoot apical meristem to take on stem cell properties. The goal of this project is to understand how the synthesis and accumulation of the mRNAs and proteins encoded by these genes is controlled. A thorough understanding of the molecules that control the growth ofmore » shoot apical meristems in plants will help us to manipulate food, fiber and biofuel crops to better feed, clothe and provide energy for humans.« less
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