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Title: Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution

Authors:
; ; ; ; ; ; ; ;
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1349401
DOE Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: ACS Energy Letters; Journal Volume: 1; Journal Issue: 3
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English

Citation Formats

Seh, Zhi Wei, Fredrickson, Kurt D., Anasori, Babak, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Strickler, Alaina L., Lukatskaya, Maria R., Gogotsi, Yury, Jaramillo, Thomas F., and Vojvodic, Aleksandra. Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00247.
Seh, Zhi Wei, Fredrickson, Kurt D., Anasori, Babak, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Strickler, Alaina L., Lukatskaya, Maria R., Gogotsi, Yury, Jaramillo, Thomas F., & Vojvodic, Aleksandra. Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution. United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00247.
Seh, Zhi Wei, Fredrickson, Kurt D., Anasori, Babak, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Strickler, Alaina L., Lukatskaya, Maria R., Gogotsi, Yury, Jaramillo, Thomas F., and Vojvodic, Aleksandra. 2016. "Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution". United States. doi:10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00247.
@article{osti_1349401,
title = {Two-Dimensional Molybdenum Carbide (MXene) as an Efficient Electrocatalyst for Hydrogen Evolution},
author = {Seh, Zhi Wei and Fredrickson, Kurt D. and Anasori, Babak and Kibsgaard, Jakob and Strickler, Alaina L. and Lukatskaya, Maria R. and Gogotsi, Yury and Jaramillo, Thomas F. and Vojvodic, Aleksandra},
abstractNote = {},
doi = {10.1021/acsenergylett.6b00247},
journal = {ACS Energy Letters},
number = 3,
volume = 1,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 9
}
  • Electrochemistry is central to applications in the field of energy storage and generation. However, it has advanced far more slowly over the last two decades, mainly because of a lack of suitable and affordable catalysts. Here, we report the synthesis of highly crystalline layered three-dimensional (3D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) catalysts with bare Mo-edge atoms and demonstrate their remarkable performance for the hydrogen evolution reaction (HER). We found that Mo-edge-terminated 3D MoS2 directly grown on graphene film exhibits a remarkable exchange current density (18.2 mu A cm(-2)) and turnover frequency (>4 S-1) for HER. The obtained exchange current density is 15.2more » and 2.3 times higher than that of MoS2/graphene and MoS2/Au catalysts, respectively, both with sulfided Mo-edge atoms. An easily scalable and robust growth process on a wide variety of substrates, along with prolonged stability, suggests that this material is a promising catalyst in energy-related applications.« less
  • Two-dimensional transition metal carbides and nitrides (MXenes) are one of the largest and fastest growing families of materials. The presence of molecular hydrogen at ambient conditions in a MXene (Ti 3C 2T x, where T x represents a surface terminating species, including O, OH, and F) material is revealed here by inelastic and elastic neutron scatterings. The inelastic neutron-scattering spectrum measured at 5 K shows a peak at 14.6 meV, presenting a clear indication of the presence of parahydrogen in the MXene synthesized using 48% hydrofluoric acid and annealed at 110°C in vacuum prior to the measurement. An increase inmore » the measurement temperature gradually reduces the peak intensity and increases the peak width due to the mobility of the molecular hydrogen in confinement. The presence of molecular hydrogen is confirmed further from the observed elastic intensity drop in a fixed energy-window scan of elastic intensity measurements in the temperature range of 10–35 K. Using milder etching conditions, ion intercalation, or an increase in the annealing temperature all result in the absence of the trapped hydrogen molecules in MXene. Here, the results of this paper can guide the development of MXene materials with desired properties and improve our understanding of the behavior of MXenes in applications ranging from supercapacitors to hydrogen evolution reaction catalysis and hydrogen storage.« less