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Title: Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design

Abstract

Electrocatalysis plays a central role in clean energy conversion, enabling a number of sustainable processes for future technologies. This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts and associated materials for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performance. By examining the common principles that govern catalysis for different electrochemical reactions, we describe a systematic framework that clarifies trends in catalyzing these reactions, serving as a guide to new catalyst development while highlighting key gaps that need to be addressed. Here, we conclude by extending this framework to emerging clean energy reactions such as hydrogen peroxide production, carbon dioxide reduction, and nitrogen reduction, where the development of improved catalysts could allow for the sustainable production of a broad range of fuels and chemicals.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [3];  [3]
  1. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, Innovis (Singapore)
  2. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)
  3. Stanford Univ., Stanford, CA (United States); SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
  4. Technical Univ. of Denmark, Kongens Lyngby (Denmark)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1349286
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Science
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 355; Journal Issue: 6321; Journal ID: ISSN 0036-8075
Publisher:
AAAS
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; 36 MATERIALS SCIENCE

Citation Formats

Seh, Zhi Wei, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Dickens, Colin F., Chorkendorff, Ib, Nørskov, Jens K., and Jaramillo, Thomas F. Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1126/science.aad4998.
Seh, Zhi Wei, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Dickens, Colin F., Chorkendorff, Ib, Nørskov, Jens K., & Jaramillo, Thomas F. Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design. United States. doi:10.1126/science.aad4998.
Seh, Zhi Wei, Kibsgaard, Jakob, Dickens, Colin F., Chorkendorff, Ib, Nørskov, Jens K., and Jaramillo, Thomas F. Thu . "Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design". United States. doi:10.1126/science.aad4998. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349286.
@article{osti_1349286,
title = {Combining theory and experiment in electrocatalysis: Insights into materials design},
author = {Seh, Zhi Wei and Kibsgaard, Jakob and Dickens, Colin F. and Chorkendorff, Ib and Nørskov, Jens K. and Jaramillo, Thomas F.},
abstractNote = {Electrocatalysis plays a central role in clean energy conversion, enabling a number of sustainable processes for future technologies. This review discusses design strategies for state-of-the-art heterogeneous electrocatalysts and associated materials for several different electrochemical transformations involving water, hydrogen, and oxygen, using theory as a means to rationalize catalyst performance. By examining the common principles that govern catalysis for different electrochemical reactions, we describe a systematic framework that clarifies trends in catalyzing these reactions, serving as a guide to new catalyst development while highlighting key gaps that need to be addressed. Here, we conclude by extending this framework to emerging clean energy reactions such as hydrogen peroxide production, carbon dioxide reduction, and nitrogen reduction, where the development of improved catalysts could allow for the sustainable production of a broad range of fuels and chemicals.},
doi = {10.1126/science.aad4998},
journal = {Science},
number = 6321,
volume = 355,
place = {United States},
year = {Thu Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Thu Jan 12 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 177works
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