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Title: Tidal stripping as a test of satellite quenching in redMaPPer clusters

Abstract

When dark matter haloes are accreted by massive host clusters, strong gravitational tidal forces begin stripping mass from the accreted subhaloes. This stripping eventually removes all mass beyond a subhalo's tidal radius, with unbound mass remaining in the vicinity of the satellite for at most a dynamical time tdyn. The N-body subhalo study of Chamberlain et al. verified this picture and pointed out a useful observational consequence: correlations between subhaloes beyond the tidal radius are sensitive to the infall time, tinfall, of the subhalo on to its host. We perform this correlation using ~160 000 red satellite galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey redMaPPer clusters and find evidence that subhalo correlations do persist well beyond the tidal radius, suggesting that many of the observed satellites fell into their current host less than a dynamical time ago, tinfall < tdyn. Combined with estimated dynamical times tdyn ~3–5 Gyr and SED fitting results for the time at which satellites stopped forming stars, tquench ~6 Gyr, we infer that for a significant fraction of the satellites, star formation quenched before those satellites entered their current hosts. Finally, the result holds for red satellites over a large range of cluster-centric distances 0.1–0.6 Mpc hmore » –1. We discuss the implications of this result for models of galaxy formation.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [2];  [1];  [3];  [4];  [5]
  1. Univ. of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)
  2. Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL (United States)
  3. Univ. of Arizona, Tucson, AZ (United States)
  4. Siena College, Loudonville, NY (United States)
  5. SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349270
Grant/Contract Number:
AC02-76SF00515
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 463; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 0035-8711
Publisher:
Royal Astronomical Society
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
79 ASTRONOMY AND ASTROPHYSICS; galaxies: clusters: general; galaxies: formation

Citation Formats

Fang, Yuedong, Clampitt, Joseph, Dalal, Neal, Jain, Bhuvnesh, Rozo, Eduardo, Moustakas, John, and Rykoff, Eli. Tidal stripping as a test of satellite quenching in redMaPPer clusters. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2108.
Fang, Yuedong, Clampitt, Joseph, Dalal, Neal, Jain, Bhuvnesh, Rozo, Eduardo, Moustakas, John, & Rykoff, Eli. Tidal stripping as a test of satellite quenching in redMaPPer clusters. United States. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2108.
Fang, Yuedong, Clampitt, Joseph, Dalal, Neal, Jain, Bhuvnesh, Rozo, Eduardo, Moustakas, John, and Rykoff, Eli. 2016. "Tidal stripping as a test of satellite quenching in redMaPPer clusters". United States. doi:10.1093/mnras/stw2108. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349270.
@article{osti_1349270,
title = {Tidal stripping as a test of satellite quenching in redMaPPer clusters},
author = {Fang, Yuedong and Clampitt, Joseph and Dalal, Neal and Jain, Bhuvnesh and Rozo, Eduardo and Moustakas, John and Rykoff, Eli},
abstractNote = {When dark matter haloes are accreted by massive host clusters, strong gravitational tidal forces begin stripping mass from the accreted subhaloes. This stripping eventually removes all mass beyond a subhalo's tidal radius, with unbound mass remaining in the vicinity of the satellite for at most a dynamical time tdyn. The N-body subhalo study of Chamberlain et al. verified this picture and pointed out a useful observational consequence: correlations between subhaloes beyond the tidal radius are sensitive to the infall time, tinfall, of the subhalo on to its host. We perform this correlation using ~160 000 red satellite galaxies in Sloan Digital Sky Survey redMaPPer clusters and find evidence that subhalo correlations do persist well beyond the tidal radius, suggesting that many of the observed satellites fell into their current host less than a dynamical time ago, tinfall < tdyn. Combined with estimated dynamical times tdyn ~3–5 Gyr and SED fitting results for the time at which satellites stopped forming stars, tquench ~6 Gyr, we infer that for a significant fraction of the satellites, star formation quenched before those satellites entered their current hosts. Finally, the result holds for red satellites over a large range of cluster-centric distances 0.1–0.6 Mpc h–1. We discuss the implications of this result for models of galaxy formation.},
doi = {10.1093/mnras/stw2108},
journal = {Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society},
number = 2,
volume = 463,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

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  • Two sorts of arguments are presented which suggest that the luminosity distribution in rich clusters of galaxies-including the morphology of first-ranked or cD galaxies--is fixed during cluste collapse and changes very little afterward. First, it is shown that some of the properties of bright cluster galaxies that are often taken to imply ongoing evolution, such as their central locations and extended envelopes, are more likely a result of dynamical processes that occurred during cluster collapse. Second, it is shown that truncation of galaxy halos during cluster collapse is probably sufficiently strong to ''turn off'' subsequent evolution by making time scalesmore » for dynamical friction and collisional stripping longer than a Hubble time. The dynamical evolution of a cluster after its formation is simulated using the computer code described in an earlier paper, after a modification which permits galaxy masses and luminosities to be treated independently. The fraction of a cluster's binding matter that is attached to galaxies is assumed to be set by the limiting of the cluster's mean tidal field. The results suggest that the number of merger candidates in the core of a rich cluster does not increase significantly as a result of dynamical evolution. Contrary to recent claims by various authors, the growth rate of a cD galaxy due to mergers should therefore be negligible, unless a substantial population of galaxies is bound to the cD at cluster formation.« less
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  • A set of differential equations is derived which describes the evolution of a rich cluster of galaxies over relaxation time scales. Two physical processes are included. Exchange of orbital kinetic energy between galaxies of different masses, due to gravitational two-body encounters, is computed from the isotropic, orbit-averaged Fokker-Planck equation. Tidal stripping of galaxies with massive halos is approximated by the corss sections of Richstone. The fraction of cluster mass in the ''background'' is allowed to increase with time as the galaxies are stripped; the energy of the background also increases due to dynamical interaction with the galaxies. The equations aremore » integrated numerically, starting from a Schechter distribution of galaxy masses. Unless most of the virial mass in initially in the background, tidal stripping tends to obscure the effects of mass segregation (though not, presumably, luminosity segregation) by rapidly depleting the cluster core of massive galaxies. The background so produced dominates the core and is strongly concentrated to the center, falling off as r/sup -4/ at large radii. Putting most of the mass initially in the background increases the importance of mass segregation relative to stripping; in this case the galaxy distribution develops a significantly smaller core radius than the background. The final core mass distribution is qualitatively similar in both cases to that of a cD galaxy, in that it contains a central mass of low velocity dispersion surrounded by a high velocity dispersion envelope. However, the mass in the cluster core tends to decrease with time. Tidal strippings greatly increases dynamical friction time scales by reducing galaxy masses, and these results suggest that the small amounts of luminosity segregation observed in rich clusters might be consistent with all of the cluster mass having been originally tied to galaxies.« less
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