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Title: EPIC Calibration/Validation Experiment Field Campaign Report

Abstract

A field exercise involving several different kinds of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and supporting instrumentation systems provided by DOE/ARM and NOAA/NSSL was conducted at the ARM SGP site in Lamont, Oklahoma on 29-30 October 2016. This campaign was part of a larger National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) UAS Program Office program awarded to the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). named Environmental Profiling and Initiation of Convection (EPIC). The EPIC Field Campaign (Test and Calibration/Validation) proposed to ARM was a test or “dry-run” for a follow-up campaign to be requested for spring/summer 2017. The EPIC project addresses NOAA’s objective to “evaluate options for UAS profiling of the lower atmosphere with applications for severe weather.” The project goal is to demonstrate that fixed-wing and rotary-wing small UAS have the combined potential to provide a unique observing system capable of providing detailed profiles of temperature, moisture, and winds within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to help determine the potential for severe weather development. Specific project objectives are: 1) to develop small UAS capable of acquiring needed wind and thermodynamic profiles and transects of the ABL using one fixed-wing UAS operating in tandem with two different fixed rotary-wing UAS pairs; 2) adapt andmore » test miniaturized, high-precision, and fast-response atmospheric sensors with high accuracy in strong winds characteristic of the pre-convective ABL in Oklahoma; 3) conduct targeted short-duration experiments at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in northern Oklahoma concurrently with a second site to be chosen in “real-time” from the Oklahoma Mesonet in coordination with the (National Weather Service (NWS)-Norman Forecast Office; and 4) gain valuable experience in pursuit of NOAA’s goals for determining the value of airborne, mobile observing systems for monitoring rapidly evolving high-impact severe weather conditions not observed with current operational systems. OU operated three UAS at the Lamont SGP site – the OU CopterSonde, the OU Iris, and the Meteomatics Meteodrone – under a blanket Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA) allowing flights up to 400 feet above ground level (AGL). The mission for the rotary-wing UAS involved four aircraft, three from the ARM Lamont site and one from an Oklahoma Mesonet site located at Medford, involving a vertical ascent to an altitude of 400 ft (130 m) AGL at ~ 30 minute intervals for ~ 5 hours duration on each of the two experiment days. This operation was conducted in close coordination with NSSL-launched rawinsonde balloons at the two sites, and operation of a fixed-wing UAS from the University of Colorado called the TTwistor that flew mission flight legs between the Lamont site and Medford. The NSSL operation at Medford (outside of ARM) also involved use of their Collaborative Lower Atmosphere Mobile Profiling System (CLAMPS) ground-based remote-sensing system for measuring atmospheric profiles of temperature, moisture, and winds with atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), microwave radiometer, and Doppler wind lidar systems. The ARM Facility supported the project by providing access to their instrumented tower data at Lamont (at three levels), as well as AERI and Doppler wind lidar data obtained from systems quite similar to those used by CLAMPS. These non-UAS data from both ARM and NSSL provided the observations used to validate the experimental UAS observations.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3]
  1. National Severe Storm Laboratory/NOAA
  2. University of Oklahoma
  3. University of Colorado
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
DOE Office of Science Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Biological and Environmental Research (BER) (SC-23)
Contributing Org.:
University of Oklahoma, University of Colorado, National Severe Storm Laboratory/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Meteomatics
OSTI Identifier:
1349254
Report Number(s):
DOE/SC-ARM-17-012
DOE Contract Number:  
AC05-7601830
Resource Type:
Program Document
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
Southern Great Plains, Unmanned Aerial Systems, National Severe Storms Laboratory, Environmental Profiling and Initiation of Convection, atmospheric boundary layer, microwave radiometer, Doppler wind lidar, atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer, Collaborative Lwer Atmosphere Mobile Profiling System

Citation Formats

Koch, Steven E, Chilson, Phillip, and Argrow, Brian. EPIC Calibration/Validation Experiment Field Campaign Report. United States: N. p., 2017. Web.
Koch, Steven E, Chilson, Phillip, & Argrow, Brian. EPIC Calibration/Validation Experiment Field Campaign Report. United States.
Koch, Steven E, Chilson, Phillip, and Argrow, Brian. Wed . "EPIC Calibration/Validation Experiment Field Campaign Report". United States. doi:. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349254.
@article{osti_1349254,
title = {EPIC Calibration/Validation Experiment Field Campaign Report},
author = {Koch, Steven E and Chilson, Phillip and Argrow, Brian},
abstractNote = {A field exercise involving several different kinds of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) and supporting instrumentation systems provided by DOE/ARM and NOAA/NSSL was conducted at the ARM SGP site in Lamont, Oklahoma on 29-30 October 2016. This campaign was part of a larger National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) UAS Program Office program awarded to the National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). named Environmental Profiling and Initiation of Convection (EPIC). The EPIC Field Campaign (Test and Calibration/Validation) proposed to ARM was a test or “dry-run” for a follow-up campaign to be requested for spring/summer 2017. The EPIC project addresses NOAA’s objective to “evaluate options for UAS profiling of the lower atmosphere with applications for severe weather.” The project goal is to demonstrate that fixed-wing and rotary-wing small UAS have the combined potential to provide a unique observing system capable of providing detailed profiles of temperature, moisture, and winds within the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) to help determine the potential for severe weather development. Specific project objectives are: 1) to develop small UAS capable of acquiring needed wind and thermodynamic profiles and transects of the ABL using one fixed-wing UAS operating in tandem with two different fixed rotary-wing UAS pairs; 2) adapt and test miniaturized, high-precision, and fast-response atmospheric sensors with high accuracy in strong winds characteristic of the pre-convective ABL in Oklahoma; 3) conduct targeted short-duration experiments at the ARM Southern Great Plains site in northern Oklahoma concurrently with a second site to be chosen in “real-time” from the Oklahoma Mesonet in coordination with the (National Weather Service (NWS)-Norman Forecast Office; and 4) gain valuable experience in pursuit of NOAA’s goals for determining the value of airborne, mobile observing systems for monitoring rapidly evolving high-impact severe weather conditions not observed with current operational systems. OU operated three UAS at the Lamont SGP site – the OU CopterSonde, the OU Iris, and the Meteomatics Meteodrone – under a blanket Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Certificate of Authorization (COA) allowing flights up to 400 feet above ground level (AGL). The mission for the rotary-wing UAS involved four aircraft, three from the ARM Lamont site and one from an Oklahoma Mesonet site located at Medford, involving a vertical ascent to an altitude of 400 ft (130 m) AGL at ~ 30 minute intervals for ~ 5 hours duration on each of the two experiment days. This operation was conducted in close coordination with NSSL-launched rawinsonde balloons at the two sites, and operation of a fixed-wing UAS from the University of Colorado called the TTwistor that flew mission flight legs between the Lamont site and Medford. The NSSL operation at Medford (outside of ARM) also involved use of their Collaborative Lower Atmosphere Mobile Profiling System (CLAMPS) ground-based remote-sensing system for measuring atmospheric profiles of temperature, moisture, and winds with atmospheric emitted radiance interferometer (AERI), microwave radiometer, and Doppler wind lidar systems. The ARM Facility supported the project by providing access to their instrumented tower data at Lamont (at three levels), as well as AERI and Doppler wind lidar data obtained from systems quite similar to those used by CLAMPS. These non-UAS data from both ARM and NSSL provided the observations used to validate the experimental UAS observations.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 15 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

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