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Title: Mass spectrometry imaging: towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere

Abstract

In our short review provides perspective regarding the use of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to study the rhizosphere. It also serves to complement the multi-omic-focused review by White et al. in this journals’ issue. MSI is capable of elucidating chemical distributions within samples of interest in situ, and thus can provide spatial context to MS omics data in complementary experimental endeavors. Most MSI-based studies of plant-microbe interactions have focused on the phyllosphere and on the “associated rhizosphere” (our term for material that is not removed during harvesting). Sample preparation for these in situ analyses tends to be a limiting factor. Our studies, however, have provided valuable insights into the spatial arrangement of proteins, peptides, lipids, and other metabolites within these systems. We intend this short review to be a primer on the fundamentals of MSI and its role in plant-microbe analysis. Finally, we offer a perspective on the future of MSI and its use in understanding the molecular transformations beyond what we call the associated rhizosphere, one which extends to the rest of rhizosphere and into the bulk soil.

Authors:
 [1];  [1]
  1. Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States). Environmental Molecular Science Lab.
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349081
Report Number(s):
PNNL-SA-123990
Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198; PII: S2452219817300332
Grant/Contract Number:
AC0576RL01830
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Rhizosphere
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 3; Journal Issue: 2; Journal ID: ISSN 2452-2198
Publisher:
Elsevier
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 37 INORGANIC, ORGANIC, PHYSICAL, AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY

Citation Formats

Veličković, Dušan, and Anderton, Christopher R. Mass spectrometry imaging: towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.03.003.
Veličković, Dušan, & Anderton, Christopher R. Mass spectrometry imaging: towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere. United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.03.003.
Veličković, Dušan, and Anderton, Christopher R. Wed . "Mass spectrometry imaging: towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere". United States. doi:10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.03.003. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349081.
@article{osti_1349081,
title = {Mass spectrometry imaging: towards mapping the elemental and molecular composition of the rhizosphere},
author = {Veličković, Dušan and Anderton, Christopher R.},
abstractNote = {In our short review provides perspective regarding the use of mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) to study the rhizosphere. It also serves to complement the multi-omic-focused review by White et al. in this journals’ issue. MSI is capable of elucidating chemical distributions within samples of interest in situ, and thus can provide spatial context to MS omics data in complementary experimental endeavors. Most MSI-based studies of plant-microbe interactions have focused on the phyllosphere and on the “associated rhizosphere” (our term for material that is not removed during harvesting). Sample preparation for these in situ analyses tends to be a limiting factor. Our studies, however, have provided valuable insights into the spatial arrangement of proteins, peptides, lipids, and other metabolites within these systems. We intend this short review to be a primer on the fundamentals of MSI and its role in plant-microbe analysis. Finally, we offer a perspective on the future of MSI and its use in understanding the molecular transformations beyond what we call the associated rhizosphere, one which extends to the rest of rhizosphere and into the bulk soil.},
doi = {10.1016/j.rhisph.2017.03.003},
journal = {Rhizosphere},
number = 2,
volume = 3,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Wed Mar 22 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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  • Secondary ion image depth profiling is developed for application to the chemical characterization of individual micrometer-sized particles, specifically coal combustion fly ash collected by cascade impaction. A digital imaging system interfaced to a Cameca IMS-3F ion microscope permits the simultaneous acquisition of spatially resolved mass spectral data for a number of single particles. Small regions within each particle are chosen for computer-reconstructed local area depth profiles to minimize complications of particle geometry on sputter rate and useful ion yield. Sputtering rates are calibrated by use of SiO/sub 2/ standards and correlative SEM observation of the sputtered particles. Ion intensities averagedmore » over groups of particles are related to concentrations by use of NBS standard fly ash samples. Substantial differences are often found in the relative concentrations and/or depth profiles of selected elements (Ba, Pb, Si, Th, Ti, U) from particle to particle. The technique is highly sensitive to trace elements within microvolumes. For example, the estimated U detection limit corresponds to approximately 10/sup 4/ atoms in an analytical volume of 0.1 ..mu..m/sup 3/ within a 20-..mu..m/sup 3/ single particle.« less
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