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Title: Material for "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.

Abstract

Figures and other material related to a published manuscript with the "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [1]; ORCiD logo [2]
  1. Nanjing University
  2. University of Wisconsin-Madison
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Science (SC), Basic Energy Sciences (BES) (SC-22)
OSTI Identifier:
1349073
DOE Contract Number:
SC0002161
Resource Type:
Data
Data Type:
Figures/Plots
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; vapor deposition; amorphous; thin film; organic semiconductor; molecular orientation; spectroscopic ellipsometry

Citation Formats

Jiang, Jing, Walters, Diane M, Zhou, Dongshan, and Ediger, Mark D. Material for "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.11578/1349073.
Jiang, Jing, Walters, Diane M, Zhou, Dongshan, & Ediger, Mark D. Material for "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.. United States. doi:10.11578/1349073.
Jiang, Jing, Walters, Diane M, Zhou, Dongshan, and Ediger, Mark D. 2016. "Material for "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.". United States. doi:10.11578/1349073. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349073.
@article{osti_1349073,
title = {Material for "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.},
author = {Jiang, Jing and Walters, Diane M and Zhou, Dongshan and Ediger, Mark D},
abstractNote = {Figures and other material related to a published manuscript with the "Substrate temperature controls molecular orientation in two-component vapor- deposited glasses." Soft Matter, 2016, 12, 3265.},
doi = {10.11578/1349073},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 2016,
month = 8
}

Dataset:

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  • Data set for work presented in Jiang, J.; Walters, D. M.; Zhou, D.; Ediger, M. D. “Substrate Temperature Controls Molecular Orientation in Two -Component Vapor-deposited Glasses.” Soft Matt. 2016, 12, 3265. Includes all data presented in the manuscript as well as example raw data and analysis.
  • Vapor-deposited glasses can be anisotropic and molecular orientation is important for organic electronics applications. In organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), for example, the orientation of dye molecules in two-component emitting layers significantly influences emission efficiency. Here we investigate how substrate temperature during vapor deposition influences the orientation of dye molecules in a model two-component system. We determine the average orientation of a linear blue light emitter 1,4-di-[4-( N,N-diphenyl)amino]styrylbenzene (DSA-Ph) in mixtures with aluminum-tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) (Alq 3) by spectroscopic ellipsometry and IR dichroism. We find that molecular orientation is controlled by the ratio of the substrate temperature during deposition and the glassmore » transition temperature of the mixture. Furthermore, these findings extend recent results for single component vapor-deposited glasses and suggest that, during vapor deposition, surface mobility allows partial equilibration towards orientations preferred at the free surface of the equilibrium liquid.« less
  • High thermal stability and anisotropic molecular orientation enhance the performance of vapor-deposited organic semiconductors, but controlling these properties is a challenge in amorphous materials. To understand the influence of molecular shape on these properties, vapor-deposited glasses of three disk-shaped molecules were prepared. For all three systems, enhanced thermal stability is observed for glasses prepared over a wide range of substrate temperatures and anisotropic molecular orientation is observed at lower substrate temperatures. For two of the disk-shaped molecules, atomistic simulations of thin films were also performed and anisotropic molecular orientation was observed at the equilibrium liquid surface. We find that themore » structure and thermal stability of these vapor-deposited glasses results from high surface mobility and partial equilibration toward the structure of the equilibrium liquid surface during the deposition process. For the three molecules studied, molecular shape is a dominant factor in determining the anisotropy of vapor-deposited glasses.« less
  • It has recently been established that physical vapor deposition (PVD) can produce organic glasses with enhanced kinetic stability, high density, and anisotropic packing, with the substrate temperature during deposition (Tsubstrate) as the key control parameter. The influence of hydrogen bonding on the formation of PVD glasses has not been fully explored. Herein, we use a high-throughput preparation method to vapor-deposit three triazine derivatives over a wide range of Tsubstrate, from 0.69 to 1.08Tg, where Tg is the glass transition temperature. These model systems are structural analogues containing a functional group with different H-bonding capability at the 2-position of a triazinemore » ring: (1) 2-methylamino-4,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine (NHMe) (H-bond donor), (2) 2-methoxy-4,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine (OMe) (H-bond acceptor), and (3) 2-ethyl-4,6-bis(3,5-dimethyl-phenylamino)-1,3,5-triazine (Et) (none). Using spectroscopic ellipsometry, we find that the Et and OMe compounds form PVD glasses with relatively high kinetic stability, with the transformation time (scaled by the α-relaxation time) on the order of 103, comparable to other highly stable glasses formed by PVD. In contrast, PVD glasses of NHMe are only slightly more stable than the corresponding liquid-cooled glass. Using IR spectroscopy, we find that both the supercooled liquid and the PVD glasses of the NHMe derivative show a higher average number of bonded NH per molecule than that in the other two compounds. These results suggest that H-bonds hinder the formation of stable glasses, perhaps by limiting the surface mobility. Interestingly, despite this difference in kinetic stability, all three compounds show properties typically observed in highly stable glasses prepared by PVD, including a higher density and anisotropic molecular packing (as characterized by IR and wide-angle X-ray scattering).« less