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Title: Metal–Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances

Abstract

As electronic devices get smaller and more powerful, energy density of energy storage devices increases continuously, and moving components of machinery operate at higher speeds, the need for better thermal management strategies is becoming increasingly important. The removal of heat dissipated during the operation of electronic, electrochemical, and mechanical devices is facilitated by high-performance thermal interface materials (TIMs) which are utilized to couple devices to heat sinks. Here in this paper, we report a new class of TIMs involving the chemical integration of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS), soft organic linkers, and a copper matrix -- which are prepared by chemisorption-coupled electrodeposition approach. These hybrid nanocomposites demonstrate bulk thermal conductivities ranging from 211 to 277 W/(m.K), which are very high considering their relatively low elastic modulus values on the order of 21.2 to 28.5 GPa. The synergistic combination of these properties lead to the ultra-low total thermal resistivity values in the range of 0.38 to 0.56 mm 2.K/W for a typical bondline thickness of 30-50 um, advancing the current state-of-art transformatively. Moreover, its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is 11 ppm/K, forming a mediation zone with a low thermally-induced axial stress due to its close proximity to the CTE of mostmore » coupling surfaces needing thermal management.« less

Authors:
 [1];  [2];  [3];  [3];  [4];  [1];  [5];  [2];  [6];  [7];  [5];  [1];  [8];  [3]; ORCiD logo [7]
  1. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering
  2. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Artie McFerrin Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  3. National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
  4. National Research Council (CNR), Lecce (Italy). Inst. for Microelectronics and Microsystems (IMM); Univ. of Texas-Dallas, Richardson, TX (United States). Materials Science and Engineering Dept.
  5. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Inst. for Quantum Science and Engineering, Dept. of Physics and Astronomy
  6. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Chemistry
  7. Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Artie McFerrin Dept. of Chemical Engineering
  8. Defense Advanced Research Project Agency (DARPA), Arlington, VA (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), Vehicle Technologies Office (EE-3V); Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA); National Science Foundation (NSF)
OSTI Identifier:
1349024
Report Number(s):
NREL/JA-5400-68044
Journal ID: ISSN 1944-8244
Grant/Contract Number:
AC36-08GO28308; D13AP00040; 1559627; PHY-1307153; CHE-1609608
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 9; Journal Issue: 11; Journal ID: ISSN 1944-8244
Publisher:
American Chemical Society (ACS)
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
36 MATERIALS SCIENCE; 77 NANOSCIENCE AND NANOTECHNOLOGY; thermal management; thermal interface materials; boron nitride nanosheets; hybrid nanocomposites; nanostructures; nanomaterials; thermal conductivity

Citation Formats

Yegin, Cengiz, Nagabandi, Nirup, Feng, Xuhui, King, Charles, Catalano, Massimo, Oh, Jun Kyun, Talib, Ansam J., Scholar, Ethan A., Verkhoturov, Stanislav V., Cagin, Tahir, Sokolov, Alexei V., Kim, Moon J., Matin, Kaiser, Narumanchi, Sreekant, and Akbulut, Mustafa. Metal–Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1021/acsami.7b00093.
Yegin, Cengiz, Nagabandi, Nirup, Feng, Xuhui, King, Charles, Catalano, Massimo, Oh, Jun Kyun, Talib, Ansam J., Scholar, Ethan A., Verkhoturov, Stanislav V., Cagin, Tahir, Sokolov, Alexei V., Kim, Moon J., Matin, Kaiser, Narumanchi, Sreekant, & Akbulut, Mustafa. Metal–Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances. United States. doi:10.1021/acsami.7b00093.
Yegin, Cengiz, Nagabandi, Nirup, Feng, Xuhui, King, Charles, Catalano, Massimo, Oh, Jun Kyun, Talib, Ansam J., Scholar, Ethan A., Verkhoturov, Stanislav V., Cagin, Tahir, Sokolov, Alexei V., Kim, Moon J., Matin, Kaiser, Narumanchi, Sreekant, and Akbulut, Mustafa. Mon . "Metal–Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances". United States. doi:10.1021/acsami.7b00093. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349024.
@article{osti_1349024,
title = {Metal–Organic–Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances},
author = {Yegin, Cengiz and Nagabandi, Nirup and Feng, Xuhui and King, Charles and Catalano, Massimo and Oh, Jun Kyun and Talib, Ansam J. and Scholar, Ethan A. and Verkhoturov, Stanislav V. and Cagin, Tahir and Sokolov, Alexei V. and Kim, Moon J. and Matin, Kaiser and Narumanchi, Sreekant and Akbulut, Mustafa},
abstractNote = {As electronic devices get smaller and more powerful, energy density of energy storage devices increases continuously, and moving components of machinery operate at higher speeds, the need for better thermal management strategies is becoming increasingly important. The removal of heat dissipated during the operation of electronic, electrochemical, and mechanical devices is facilitated by high-performance thermal interface materials (TIMs) which are utilized to couple devices to heat sinks. Here in this paper, we report a new class of TIMs involving the chemical integration of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS), soft organic linkers, and a copper matrix -- which are prepared by chemisorption-coupled electrodeposition approach. These hybrid nanocomposites demonstrate bulk thermal conductivities ranging from 211 to 277 W/(m.K), which are very high considering their relatively low elastic modulus values on the order of 21.2 to 28.5 GPa. The synergistic combination of these properties lead to the ultra-low total thermal resistivity values in the range of 0.38 to 0.56 mm2.K/W for a typical bondline thickness of 30-50 um, advancing the current state-of-art transformatively. Moreover, its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is 11 ppm/K, forming a mediation zone with a low thermally-induced axial stress due to its close proximity to the CTE of most coupling surfaces needing thermal management.},
doi = {10.1021/acsami.7b00093},
journal = {ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces},
number = 11,
volume = 9,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Mon Feb 27 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

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