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Title: Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion

Abstract

An industrial process for the selective activation of methane under mild conditions would be highly valuable for controlling emissions to the environment and for utilizing vast new sources of natural gas. The only selective catalysts for methane activation and conversion to methanol under mild conditions are methane monooxygenases (MMOs) found in methanotrophic bacteria; however, these enzymes are not amenable to standard enzyme immobilization approaches. Using particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), we create a biocatalytic polymer material that converts methane to methanol. We demonstrate embedding the material within a silicone lattice to create mechanically robust, gas-permeable membranes, and direct printing of micron-scale structures with controlled geometry. Remarkably, the enzymes retain up to 100% activity in the polymer construct. The printed enzyme-embedded polymer motif is highly flexible for future development and should be useful in a wide range of applications, especially those involving gas–liquid reactions.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [2];  [1]
  1. Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
  2. Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1349013
Report Number(s):
LLNL-JRNL-678269
Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Grant/Contract Number:  
AC52-07NA27344
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Nature Communications
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 7; Journal ID: ISSN 2041-1723
Publisher:
Nature Publishing Group
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
03 NATURAL GAS; 59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES

Citation Formats

Blanchette, Craig D., Knipe, Jennifer M., Stolaroff, Joshuah K., DeOtte, Joshua R., Oakdale, James S., Maiti, Amitesh, Lenhardt, Jeremy M., Sirajuddin, Sarah, Rosenzweig, Amy C., and Baker, Sarah E. Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion. United States: N. p., 2016. Web. doi:10.1038/ncomms11900.
Blanchette, Craig D., Knipe, Jennifer M., Stolaroff, Joshuah K., DeOtte, Joshua R., Oakdale, James S., Maiti, Amitesh, Lenhardt, Jeremy M., Sirajuddin, Sarah, Rosenzweig, Amy C., & Baker, Sarah E. Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion. United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms11900.
Blanchette, Craig D., Knipe, Jennifer M., Stolaroff, Joshuah K., DeOtte, Joshua R., Oakdale, James S., Maiti, Amitesh, Lenhardt, Jeremy M., Sirajuddin, Sarah, Rosenzweig, Amy C., and Baker, Sarah E. Wed . "Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion". United States. doi:10.1038/ncomms11900. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1349013.
@article{osti_1349013,
title = {Printable enzyme-embedded materials for methane to methanol conversion},
author = {Blanchette, Craig D. and Knipe, Jennifer M. and Stolaroff, Joshuah K. and DeOtte, Joshua R. and Oakdale, James S. and Maiti, Amitesh and Lenhardt, Jeremy M. and Sirajuddin, Sarah and Rosenzweig, Amy C. and Baker, Sarah E.},
abstractNote = {An industrial process for the selective activation of methane under mild conditions would be highly valuable for controlling emissions to the environment and for utilizing vast new sources of natural gas. The only selective catalysts for methane activation and conversion to methanol under mild conditions are methane monooxygenases (MMOs) found in methanotrophic bacteria; however, these enzymes are not amenable to standard enzyme immobilization approaches. Using particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO), we create a biocatalytic polymer material that converts methane to methanol. We demonstrate embedding the material within a silicone lattice to create mechanically robust, gas-permeable membranes, and direct printing of micron-scale structures with controlled geometry. Remarkably, the enzymes retain up to 100% activity in the polymer construct. The printed enzyme-embedded polymer motif is highly flexible for future development and should be useful in a wide range of applications, especially those involving gas–liquid reactions.},
doi = {10.1038/ncomms11900},
journal = {Nature Communications},
number = ,
volume = 7,
place = {United States},
year = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016},
month = {Wed Jun 15 00:00:00 EDT 2016}
}

Journal Article:
Free Publicly Available Full Text
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Cited by: 9 works
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