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Title: Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?

Abstract

Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.

Authors:
 [1]
  1. National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
New York Academy of Sciences, New York, NY (United States)
OSTI Identifier:
134870
Report Number(s):
CONF-9307221-
TRN: 95:007741-0037
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Conference: DNA damage: effects on DNA structure and protein recognition, Burlington, VT (United States), 31 Jul - 4 Aug 1993; Other Information: PBD: 1994; Related Information: Is Part Of DNA damage: Effects on DNA structure and protein recognition; Wallace, S.S.; Van Houten, B.; Kow, Yoke Wah [eds.]; PB: 395 p.
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; DNA; DNA REPAIR; MUTATIONS; GENETIC RADIATION EFFECTS; GENETIC EFFECTS; DNA SEQUENCING; GENES; TRANSCRIPTION; GENE RECOMBINATION; PROTEINS; STRUCTURE-ACTIVITY RELATIONSHIPS; NUCLEOTIDES; ANIMAL CELLS; PYRIMIDINE DIMERS; AMINO ACIDS; DNA HYBRIDIZATION; BANDING TECHNIQUES; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; XERODERMA PIGMENTOSUM; TRANSCRIPTION FACTORS

Citation Formats

Protic, M. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?. United States: N. p., 1994. Web.
Protic, M. Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?. United States.
Protic, M. 1994. "Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?". United States. doi:.
@article{osti_134870,
title = {Eukaryotic damaged DNA-binding proteins: DNA repair proteins or transcription factors?},
author = {Protic, M.},
abstractNote = {Recognition and removal of structural defects in the genome, caused by diverse physical and chemical agents, are among the most important cell functions. Proteins that recognize and bind to modified DNA, and thereby initiate damage-induced recovery processes, have been identified in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Damaged DNA-binding (DDB) proteins from prokaryotes are either DNA repair enzymes or noncatalytic subunits of larger DNA repair complexes that participate in excision repair, or in recombinational repair and SOS-mutagenesis. Although the methods employed may not have allowed detection of all eukaryotic DDB proteins and identification of their functions, it appears that during evolution cells have developed a wide array of DDB proteins that can discriminate among the diversity of DNA conformations found in the eukaryotic nucleus, as well as a gene-sharing feature found in DDB proteins that also act as transcription factors.},
doi = {},
journal = {},
number = ,
volume = ,
place = {United States},
year = 1994,
month =
}

Conference:
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