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Title: A single-atom quantum memory in silicon

Abstract

Long coherence times and fast gate operations are desirable but often conflicting requirements for physical qubits. This conflict can be resolved by resorting to fast qubits for operations, and by storing their state in a ‘quantum memory’ while idle. The 31P donor in silicon comes naturally equipped with a fast qubit (the electron spin) and a long-lived qubit (the 31P nuclear spin), coexisting in a bound state at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate storage and retrieval of quantum information from a single donor electron spin to its host phosphorus nucleus in isotopically-enriched 28Si. The fidelity of the memory process is characterised via both state and process tomography. We report an overall process fidelity Fp ! 81%, a memory fidelity Fm ! 92%, and memory storage times up to 80 ms. These values are limited by a transient shift of the electron spin resonance frequency following highpower radiofrequency pulses.

Authors:
 [1];  [1];  [1];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1];  [1];  [1];  [2];  [3];  [4];  [4];  [1]; ORCiD logo [1]
  1. Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia)
  2. Univ. of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
  3. Keio Univ., Hiyoshi (Japan)
  4. Univ. of Melbourne (Australia)
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1348332
Grant/Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Journal Article: Accepted Manuscript
Journal Name:
Quantum Science and Technology
Additional Journal Information:
Journal Volume: 2; Journal Issue: 1; Journal ID: ISSN 2058-9565
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
97 MATHEMATICS AND COMPUTING

Citation Formats

Freer, Solomon, Simmons, Stephanie, Laucht, Arne, Muhonen, Juha T., Dehollain, Juan P., Kalra, Rachpon, Mohiyaddin, Fahd A., Hudson, Fay E., Itoh, Kohei M., McCallum, Jeffrey C., Jamieson, David N., Dzurak, Andrew S., and Morello, Andrea. A single-atom quantum memory in silicon. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1088/2058-9565/aa63a4.
Freer, Solomon, Simmons, Stephanie, Laucht, Arne, Muhonen, Juha T., Dehollain, Juan P., Kalra, Rachpon, Mohiyaddin, Fahd A., Hudson, Fay E., Itoh, Kohei M., McCallum, Jeffrey C., Jamieson, David N., Dzurak, Andrew S., & Morello, Andrea. A single-atom quantum memory in silicon. United States. doi:10.1088/2058-9565/aa63a4.
Freer, Solomon, Simmons, Stephanie, Laucht, Arne, Muhonen, Juha T., Dehollain, Juan P., Kalra, Rachpon, Mohiyaddin, Fahd A., Hudson, Fay E., Itoh, Kohei M., McCallum, Jeffrey C., Jamieson, David N., Dzurak, Andrew S., and Morello, Andrea. Mon . "A single-atom quantum memory in silicon". United States. doi:10.1088/2058-9565/aa63a4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/1348332.
@article{osti_1348332,
title = {A single-atom quantum memory in silicon},
author = {Freer, Solomon and Simmons, Stephanie and Laucht, Arne and Muhonen, Juha T. and Dehollain, Juan P. and Kalra, Rachpon and Mohiyaddin, Fahd A. and Hudson, Fay E. and Itoh, Kohei M. and McCallum, Jeffrey C. and Jamieson, David N. and Dzurak, Andrew S. and Morello, Andrea},
abstractNote = {Long coherence times and fast gate operations are desirable but often conflicting requirements for physical qubits. This conflict can be resolved by resorting to fast qubits for operations, and by storing their state in a ‘quantum memory’ while idle. The 31P donor in silicon comes naturally equipped with a fast qubit (the electron spin) and a long-lived qubit (the 31P nuclear spin), coexisting in a bound state at cryogenic temperatures. Here, we demonstrate storage and retrieval of quantum information from a single donor electron spin to its host phosphorus nucleus in isotopically-enriched 28Si. The fidelity of the memory process is characterised via both state and process tomography. We report an overall process fidelity Fp ! 81%, a memory fidelity Fm ! 92%, and memory storage times up to 80 ms. These values are limited by a transient shift of the electron spin resonance frequency following highpower radiofrequency pulses.},
doi = {10.1088/2058-9565/aa63a4},
journal = {Quantum Science and Technology},
number = 1,
volume = 2,
place = {United States},
year = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017},
month = {Mon Mar 20 00:00:00 EDT 2017}
}

Journal Article:
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