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Title: Developing a Radiation Protection Hub

Abstract

The WARP report issued by the NCRP study committee estimates that in ten years there will be a human capital crisis across the radiation safety community. The ability to respond to this shortage will be amplified by the fact that many radiation protection (health physics) academic programs will find it difficult to justify their continued existence since they are low volume programs, both in terms of enrollment and research funding, compared to the research funding return and visibility of more highly subscribed and highly funded academic disciplines. In addition, across the national laboratory complex, radiation protection research groups have been disbanded or dramatically reduced in size. The loss of both of these national resources is being accelerated by low and uncertain government funding priorities. The most effective solution to this problem would be to form a consortium that would bring together the radiation protection research, academic and training communities. The goal of such a consortium would be to engage in research, education and training of the next generation of radiation protection professionals. Furthermore the consortium could bring together the strengths of different universities, national laboratory programs and other entities in a strategic manner to accomplish a multifaceted research, educational andmore » training agenda. This vision would forge a working and funded relationship between major research universities, national labs, four-year degree institutes, technical colleges and other partners.« less

Authors:
 [1]
  1. ORNL
Publication Date:
Research Org.:
Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)
Sponsoring Org.:
USDOE
OSTI Identifier:
1348322
DOE Contract Number:
AC05-00OR22725
Resource Type:
Conference
Resource Relation:
Journal Volume: 112; Journal Issue: 2; Conference: 2016 National Council on Radiation Protection annual meeting, Bethesda, MD, USA, 20160410, 20160412
Country of Publication:
United States
Language:
English
Subject:
consortium on radiation protection

Citation Formats

Hertel, Nolan E. Developing a Radiation Protection Hub. United States: N. p., 2017. Web. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000621.
Hertel, Nolan E. Developing a Radiation Protection Hub. United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000621.
Hertel, Nolan E. Sun . "Developing a Radiation Protection Hub". United States. doi:10.1097/HP.0000000000000621.
@article{osti_1348322,
title = {Developing a Radiation Protection Hub},
author = {Hertel, Nolan E},
abstractNote = {The WARP report issued by the NCRP study committee estimates that in ten years there will be a human capital crisis across the radiation safety community. The ability to respond to this shortage will be amplified by the fact that many radiation protection (health physics) academic programs will find it difficult to justify their continued existence since they are low volume programs, both in terms of enrollment and research funding, compared to the research funding return and visibility of more highly subscribed and highly funded academic disciplines. In addition, across the national laboratory complex, radiation protection research groups have been disbanded or dramatically reduced in size. The loss of both of these national resources is being accelerated by low and uncertain government funding priorities. The most effective solution to this problem would be to form a consortium that would bring together the radiation protection research, academic and training communities. The goal of such a consortium would be to engage in research, education and training of the next generation of radiation protection professionals. Furthermore the consortium could bring together the strengths of different universities, national laboratory programs and other entities in a strategic manner to accomplish a multifaceted research, educational and training agenda. This vision would forge a working and funded relationship between major research universities, national labs, four-year degree institutes, technical colleges and other partners.},
doi = {10.1097/HP.0000000000000621},
journal = {},
number = 2,
volume = 112,
place = {United States},
year = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017},
month = {Sun Jan 01 00:00:00 EST 2017}
}

Conference:
Other availability
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  • Teamwork, productivity, and reducing exposure are admirable goals presented to the workers in a nuclear power plant. A common thread to achievement in these areas resides in worker attitudes toward the tasks presented. A positive, alert, and cooperative attitude is an element in a worker's mind that must be created and maintained by good leadership and management practices. At the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, management has used certain strategies to foster good positive worker attitudes toward radiation protection and quality workmanship in all tasks. Strategies differ from management by objectives in that they have no deadlines or timetables inmore » and of themselves. Rather, strategies are preplanned methods that can be called upon when the opportunity arises to improve worker attitudes. A series of five strategies for positive attitude development are described in the full paper. The strategies are identified with buzz words to allow the user a recall mechanism (as with the acronyms abounding in the nuclear industry). They cover the range of management techniques from example setting to reward/recognition. Although not unique to radiation exposure management, nor all inclusive, the strategies provide some though stimulation in creating productive worker attitudes.« less
  • Some aspects of the difficulties encountered in the dose equivalent system used in radiation protection are explored and recent work to improve these deficiencies described. The philosophical advantages of a departure from the dose equivalent-based system and its replacement by a risk-based system are briefly discussed. The definition of dose equivalent and the debate concerning its physical dimensions and units are described. Dose equivalent is related to other physiological quantities in physics and the treatment of these quantities in the International System of Units compared. Practical problems in the determination of dose equivalent are illustrated using neutrons as an example.more » The proliferation of operational quantities for the evaluation of neutron dose equivalent and the concomitant potential for confusion when determinations of neutron dose equivalent are intercompared is described. The evaluation of fluence to dose equivalent conversion coefficients and methods of interpolation between recommended values are described. Particular emphasis is given to the accuracy and precision of dose equivalent estimation. Recent work of a Task Group of the ICRP to improve recommended conversion coefficients and the work of an ICRU committee to improve the definition of operational dose equivalent quantities is summarized. 125 references, 11 figures, 4 tables.« less
  • Presentations in this conference addressed various aspects of risk estimation, somatic effects, effects on the embryo-fetus, genetic impacts, non-stochastic effects, and implications for the NCRP program. Also included is the Eighth Lauriston S. Taylor Lecture, ''Limitation and Assessment in Radiation Protection,'' presented by Harold H. Rossi. Representatives from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Environmental Protection Agency, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, and Department of Energy participated in a Scientific Briefing Session entitled ''What the NCRP Should be Doing for Federal Agencies.'' The meeting closed with brief progress reports from NCRP scientific committees concerned with (1) Biological effects and exposure criteriamore » for radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation, (2) Radiation protection in mammography, (3) Radiation exposure and potentially related injury, (4) Policy in regard to the international system of units, and (5) Radiation exposure control in a nuclear emergency. Twenty articles were abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base and the International Nuclear Information System.« less